2012
DOI: 10.1590/s1676-06032012000400029 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Understanding the causes and consequences of variation in reproductive strategies is a central theme in studies of avian life history evolution. This study describes the reproductive biology of Synallaxis albescens (Furnariidae) in the cerrado biome of central Brazil. We monitored 35 nests during the 2003 to 2011 breeding seasons, visiting them every 2-4 days. Synallaxis albescens breeds from mid-September to mid-January, builds a retort-shaped nest, and generally lays three immaculate white eggs. Eggs weighed… Show more

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“…In a Cerrado-Amazonia transition, in north Tocantins, Pascoal et al (2016) reported that M. cayanensis used synthetic wool and plastic in their nests (Wikiaves data: WA1853400). As it is a species highly adapted to urban environments, the availability of suitable plant material may sometimes be insufficient for nest construction, which leads to the birds using material discarded by humans (Borges & Marini 2010, Marini et al 2012, Suárez-Rodriguez et al 2017, Batisteli et al 2020, Lima & Guilherme 2020.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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“…In a Cerrado-Amazonia transition, in north Tocantins, Pascoal et al (2016) reported that M. cayanensis used synthetic wool and plastic in their nests (Wikiaves data: WA1853400). As it is a species highly adapted to urban environments, the availability of suitable plant material may sometimes be insufficient for nest construction, which leads to the birds using material discarded by humans (Borges & Marini 2010, Marini et al 2012, Suárez-Rodriguez et al 2017, Batisteli et al 2020, Lima & Guilherme 2020.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…In a cerrado in south-west Mato Grosso, Almeida et al (2012) reported that several bird species used synthetic wool, fabric and plastic in their nests, including Silver-beaked Tanager. As it is a species highly adapted to anthropogenic environments, the availability of suitable plant material may sometimes be insufficient for nest construction, which leads to the birds using material discarded by humans (Borges & Marini 2010, Marini et al 2012, Suárez-Rodriguez et al 2017, Batisteli et al 2020.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…Nests were similar in shape and were built with similar materials as previously reported, but also had anthropogenic materials, as found by Skutch (1969a) and Thomas (1983) in Venezuela. The Pale-breasted Spinetail (Synallaxis albescens), who also builds enclosed nests with sticks, also used anthropogenic materials at our study grid (Marini et al 2012). The presence of plastic, paper and other anthropogenic materials in birds' nests can decrease their breeding success (Borges and Marini 2010) because these artificial materials make nests more conspicuous to visually oriented predators.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…The 1 × 1 km grid, was divided into four hundred 50 × 50 m squares on a flat topography at an altitude of ~1,040 m. The grid is covered with a mosaic of different vegetation physiognomies (Suppl. material 1: Table S1), in the following order, from more open to more closed: campo limpo (grassland), campo sujo (open shrub savanna), parque cerrado (savanna vegetation with distinctive woody vegetation on the discrete mounds), cerrado ralo (savanna vegetation with a sparse tree-shrub stratum with tortuous trunks, irregular branches, and a continuous grassy stratum), and cerrado típico (similar to cerrado ralo with higher tree density, height, and cover) (Silva Júnior and Felfili 1996;Borges and Marini 2010;Marini et al 2012). The climate is highly seasonal, with a rainy season from October to April and dry winters from May to September.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning