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Cited by 6 publications
(5 citation statements)
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References 11 publications
(8 reference statements)
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“…This can be attributed to greater addition of organic residue from maize (approximately 10 Mg ha -1 shoot and root dry mass) compared to sunflower (approximately 3 Mg ha -1 shoot and root dry mass). Occasionally, this increase in the amount of particulate matter present in the soil surface may contribute to future increase in SOC and NT, and consequently increase soil organic matter (Conte et al, 2009). Therefore, the increase in SOC and NT from 2009/10 to 2010/11, aside from the contribution due to the addition of UWC, could be related to maize cultivated in the 2010/11 season.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This can be attributed to greater addition of organic residue from maize (approximately 10 Mg ha -1 shoot and root dry mass) compared to sunflower (approximately 3 Mg ha -1 shoot and root dry mass). Occasionally, this increase in the amount of particulate matter present in the soil surface may contribute to future increase in SOC and NT, and consequently increase soil organic matter (Conte et al, 2009). Therefore, the increase in SOC and NT from 2009/10 to 2010/11, aside from the contribution due to the addition of UWC, could be related to maize cultivated in the 2010/11 season.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These authors observed no significant difference in relation to root dry matter production, regardless of the cultivar or the phenological stage. Conte et al (2009) also observed no significant effect on root dry matter in the cultivation of irrigated and non-irrigated corn.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 75%
“…The increased dry mass of the roots was obtained at a nitrogen dose of 100 mg dm -3 , with an interaction of 15 kPa tension at the beginning of irrigation, producing 68.41 g, but when independent of fertilizer applied, the best results of the root dry mass were provided when the plant was subjected to irrigation when the soil water tension reached 15 kPa. Conte et al (2009) found no significant effect on the root dry mass in irrigated and non-irrigated maize, and the authors attributed this result to the high coefficient of variation of 36.0%. Analyzing the results of the soil water stress for irrigation in relation to fertilization with nitrogen for the production of the root dry mass of maize, only the voltages of 15.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 95%