2018
DOI: 10.1002/jmor.20908
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Relative size variation of the otoliths, swim bladder, and Weberian apparatus structures in piranhas and pacus (Characiformes: Serrasalmidae) with different ecologies and its implications for the detection of sound stimuli

Abstract: The Weberian apparatus of otophysan fishes confers acute hearing that is hypothesized to allow these fishes to assess the environment and to find food resources. The otophysan family Serrasalmidae (piranhas and pacus) includes species known to feed on falling fruits and seeds (frugivore/granivores) that splash in rivers, herbivorous species associated with torrents and rapids (rheophiles), and carnivores that feed aggressively within shoals. Relevant sound stimuli may vary among these ecological groups and hea… Show more

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Cited by 7 publications
(5 citation statements)
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“…In addition, otolith size may be a potential adaptation to enhance sound detection and contribute to an end organ’s high-frequency sensitivity. Recently, Boyle and Herrel (2018) postulated that the lower mass utricular and lagenar otoliths found in serrasalmids (otophysans including piranhas and pacus), which inhabit environments with fast moving water, may allow end organs to retain high-frequency sensitivity in low-frequency noisy environments to effectively enhance hearing sensitivity. Future studies that examine the size and mass of midshipman lagenar and utriclular otoliths may provide additional insight into how oto-lith mass contributes to auditory sensitivity in teleost fishes.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In addition, otolith size may be a potential adaptation to enhance sound detection and contribute to an end organ’s high-frequency sensitivity. Recently, Boyle and Herrel (2018) postulated that the lower mass utricular and lagenar otoliths found in serrasalmids (otophysans including piranhas and pacus), which inhabit environments with fast moving water, may allow end organs to retain high-frequency sensitivity in low-frequency noisy environments to effectively enhance hearing sensitivity. Future studies that examine the size and mass of midshipman lagenar and utriclular otoliths may provide additional insight into how oto-lith mass contributes to auditory sensitivity in teleost fishes.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Otophysan fishes) or have their swim bladders (often with anterior swim bladder extensions) in close proximity to the auditory end organ(s) (e.g. Holocentridae, Gadidae, Gerreidae, Sciaenidae, Chaetodontidae, Cichlidae and Serrasalmidae; Nelson, 1955;Braun and Grande, 2008;Parmentier et al, 2011;Tricas and Boyle, 2015;Tricas and Webb, 2016;Ladich, 2016;Boyle and Herrel, 2018). Having the swim bladder in close proximity to the inner ear not only increases sensitivity to pressure indirectly but also extends the upper range of frequency sensitivity.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Because acoustic particle motion attenuates more rapidly than sound pressure, pressure-sensitive fish are able to detect higher acoustic frequencies at a greater distance from the sound source (Bass and Clark, 2003;Popper et al, 2003;Hawkins and Popper, 2018). Thus, this difference in the propagation properties of underwater sound may have in part driven the evolution of accessory hearing morphologies in pressure-sensitive teleosts, leading to the enhanced sensitivity and bandwidth (Ladich, 2000(Ladich, , 2013Ladich and Schulz-Mirbach, 2016;Boyle and Herrel, 2018).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…We coded the traits as present at any internal nodes whose corresponding posterior probabilities were ≥66% (e.g. 54,55 ), and made note of any nodes whose corresponding posterior probabilities were ≥95%. The JND (continuous) colour data was then traced through the phylogeny using the contMap() function.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%