2015
DOI: 10.1590/s0100-736x2015000100012 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Hyphema (hemorrhage within the anterior chamber of the eye) can be caused by several mechanisms and can easily be detected in routine ophthalmic or necroscopic examination as discolored red eye(s). The purpose of this study is to report the cause of hyphema diagnosed as a postmortem finding in dogs and cats. Twenty cases, 14 dogs and six cats of several ages and breeds and of both sexes were included in the study. Hyphema presented as a unilateral (14 cases out of 20) or bilateral (6/20) disorder in dogs and c… Show more

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“…Roughly, 25% dogs (23 dogs) were diagnosed with traumatic hyphema. This percentage is similar to a previous study, which reported that 20% of cases with hyphema presenting for necropsy had evidence of, or a history of, trauma . All dogs with hyphema secondary to trauma in that study, and in this current study had unilateral disease .…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
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“…Roughly, 25% dogs (23 dogs) were diagnosed with traumatic hyphema. This percentage is similar to a previous study, which reported that 20% of cases with hyphema presenting for necropsy had evidence of, or a history of, trauma . All dogs with hyphema secondary to trauma in that study, and in this current study had unilateral disease .…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
“…This percentage is similar to a previous study, which reported that 20% of cases with hyphema presenting for necropsy had evidence of, or a history of, trauma . All dogs with hyphema secondary to trauma in that study, and in this current study had unilateral disease . Similar to trauma, all dogs with local ocular disease, including congenital abnormalities, primary ocular neoplasia, perforated ulcers and foreign bodies, acute uveitis following phacoemulsification and chronic uveitis, had unilateral hyphema.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
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“…There are numerous potential intraocular causes for hyphema, such as blunt or penetrating trauma, inflammation, retinal detachment, primary or metastatic neoplasia, iatrogenic procedures, congenital anomalies, and chronic glaucoma (Tessie and Claudio, 2015). When trauma has been eliminated as a possible cause, it is prudent to assume that every animal with hyphema has a serious systemic disease until proven otherwise (Andras et al, 1999).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning