1962
DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2621.1962.tb00107.x View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: SUMMARY Small concentrations of linoleic and linolenic acids reduced the solubility of cod actomyosin rapidly. The extent of insolubilization depended on the structure of the fatty acid, on its concentration, and on the duration of storage of the fatty‐acid‐treated actomyosin solutions. The results support the hypothesis that the accumulation of free fatty acids in frozen fish muscle causes the actomyosin of the muscle to become inextractable.

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“…Possible mechanisms of protein insolubilization may include the destruction of stabilizing lipid on "actomyosin" and/or the interaction of FFA and actomyosin with the consequence of the creation of numerous hydrophobic areas on protein surfaces . Using model systems, King et al (1962) demonstrated that a small amount of either linoleic or linolenic acid reduced the solubility of cod actomyosin. Conditions for myofibrillar protein-linolenate interaction have been examined (Anderson et al, 1963(Anderson et al, , 1964(Anderson et al, , 1965Hanson et al, 1965).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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“…Possible mechanisms of protein insolubilization may include the destruction of stabilizing lipid on "actomyosin" and/or the interaction of FFA and actomyosin with the consequence of the creation of numerous hydrophobic areas on protein surfaces . Using model systems, King et al (1962) demonstrated that a small amount of either linoleic or linolenic acid reduced the solubility of cod actomyosin. Conditions for myofibrillar protein-linolenate interaction have been examined (Anderson et al, 1963(Anderson et al, , 1964(Anderson et al, , 1965Hanson et al, 1965).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…by free fatty acid-protein interactions (Anderson et al, 1964;Dyer et al, 1959;King et al, 1962 ;Olley et al, 1965). Several investigators have reported that the peroxide value of lipid in fish muscle increased during frozen storage (Dyer et al, 1956b;Tarr, 1947).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…In an attempt to find a basis for the relationship postulated between FFA formation and protein insolubility a series of studies were carried out in one laboratory (King, Anderson & Steinberg, 1962;Anderson, King & Steinberg, 1963;Anderson & Steinberg, 1964;Anderson, Steinberg & King, 1965). The addition of fatty acids as such or as soaps to freshly prepared cod actomyosin solutions was shown to reduce the solubility, although the variable results obtained with different fatty acids and experimental conditions did not lead to an understanding of the fundamental mechanism of insolubilization.…”
Section: Lipids and Quality In Frozen Codmentioning
“…Nonenzymatic oxidation is caused by hematin compounds (hemoglobin, myoglobin and cytochrome) catalysis producing hydroperoxides [11]. The fatty acids formed during hydrolysis of fish lipids interact with sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins causing denaturation [17,18]. Undeland et al [19] reported that lipid oxidation can occur in fish muscle due to the highly pro-oxidative Hemoglobin (Hb), specifically if it is deoxygenated and/or oxidized.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning