1997
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.133.2.209
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Radiation lentigo. A distinct cutaneous lesion after accidental radiation exposure

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Cited by 15 publications
(13 citation statements)
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“…Hyperpigmentation, a melanocyte hyperplasia-induced phenomenon, is a frequent side effect noted in irradiated skin. Radiation lentigo similar to natural UV radiation or PUVA lentigines has been described in a survivor of the nuclear accident at Chernobyl who was exposed to ionizing radiation [21]. Whether ionizing radiation can induce melanoma has been questioned [22].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Hyperpigmentation, a melanocyte hyperplasia-induced phenomenon, is a frequent side effect noted in irradiated skin. Radiation lentigo similar to natural UV radiation or PUVA lentigines has been described in a survivor of the nuclear accident at Chernobyl who was exposed to ionizing radiation [21]. Whether ionizing radiation can induce melanoma has been questioned [22].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Their appearance is associated not only with acute or chronic solar exposure but also with artificial light sources, such as tanning beds and phototherapy, 6 and accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. 7 The diagnosis of a solar lentigo is a clinical one. Histologically, there is hyperpigmentation of the basal layer and elongation of the rete ridges, as well as an increase in the number of noncontiguous melanocytes, 8 which are pathologically distinct from other brown lesions, such as seborrheic keratosis, pigmented actinic keratosis, melanocytic junctional nevi, lentigo simplex, and malignant melanomas.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Heikens et al suggested that the risk of cancer is greater in a patient exposed to radiotherapy in childhood [33]. Some authors report squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) as a late complication after radiotherapy for hemangioma [23], moreover, some patients developed radiodermatitis with SCC [34]. There were cases of malignant melanoma in previously irradiated areas, these situations were rare but it seems that other factors may increase the risk of neoplasmatic transformation such as smoking cigarettes, chemotherapy, age at exposure [35,36].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%