2016
DOI: 10.1111/1475-6765.12158
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Abstract: Past work suggests that support for welfare in the United States is heavily influenced by citizens' racial attitudes. Indeed, the idea that many Americans think of welfare recipients as poor Blacks (and especially as poor Black women) has been a common explanation for Americans’ lukewarm support for redistribution. This article draws on a new online survey experiment conducted with national samples in the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada, designed to extend research on how racialised portrayals of … Show more

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Cited by 77 publications
(59 citation statements)
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References 78 publications
(59 reference statements)
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“…This leads to the conclusion that both ethnicity and immigrantstatus matters. In the US, Canada and the UK, Harell et al (2016) measured attitudes to five different benefits (in a merged measure) after varying both verbally and non-6 verbally by white, black, Hispanic, Asian, South Asian and Aboriginal ethnicity. The main effects are surprisingly modest in the US but somewhat stronger in Canada and the UK.…”
Section: Empirical Findings From Survey Methodologymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This leads to the conclusion that both ethnicity and immigrantstatus matters. In the US, Canada and the UK, Harell et al (2016) measured attitudes to five different benefits (in a merged measure) after varying both verbally and non-6 verbally by white, black, Hispanic, Asian, South Asian and Aboriginal ethnicity. The main effects are surprisingly modest in the US but somewhat stronger in Canada and the UK.…”
Section: Empirical Findings From Survey Methodologymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…If views like these remain pervasive, how can we expect to generate enough enthusiasm and buy-in to make meaningful and durable changes to parenting policies? The fundamental reason that it doesn't make sense to say things like, "don't worry about individuals' prejudices and stereotypes, just focus on changing structures," is that individuals' prejudices and stereotypes are some of the most powerful factors shaping their willingness to support (or oppose) political and structural change (Azevedo et al, 2019;Cooley et al, 2019;Harell et al, 2016;Monteith and Hildebrand, 2019;Mutz, 2018).…”
Section: Either/or Versus Both/andmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…) and predispositions that are not so closely related to welfare state principles like party attachments, political ideology (Carsey & Layman ; Gelissen ) or even racism (Harell et al. ). Of course, the predictive power of predispositions does not suggest anything about the causal direction between predispositions and attitudes.…”
Section: Unemployment and Lmp Attitudes: Causal And Non‐causal Mechanmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The most widespread example is that people who prioritise egalitarian values are more prone to supporting specific government spending programmes for the disadvantaged (e.g., Calzada et al 2014;Jacoby 2006). Other examples for predictors of social policy attitudes are deservingness beliefs (Petersen et al 2010) and predispositions that are not so closely related to welfare state principles like party attachments, political ideology (Carsey & Layman 2006;Gelissen 2000) or even racism (Harell et al 2016). Of course, the predictive power of predispositions does not suggest anything about the causal direction between predispositions and attitudes.…”
Section: Political Predispositions: Another Look At Attitudesmentioning
confidence: 99%