2006
DOI: 10.1177/0164027505285849 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Significant racial disparities in health outcomes have been consistently documented in the United States. Life-course and population-health models are often used to explain these disparities, but they generally do not take incarceration effects into account. Incarceration may have direct effects on health, but it is more likely to indirectly affect health by shaping employment, income, and marital trajectories. The authors contend that the failure of health researchers to take incarceration effects into accoun… Show more

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“…Disparities in the risk of functional limitation/disability, including differences between men and women, are rooted in structural arrangements that privilege certain groups over others. Differential patterns of participation in social institutions, including the educational (Ross and Wu 1995;Zimmer and House 2003), economic (House et al 2005;Phelan 1995, 1996;Ross and Mirowsky 1995), marriage and family (Goldman et al 1995;Ross et al 1990;Umberson et al 2006), and criminal justice systems (London and Myers 2006;Massoglia 2008;Schnittker 2007) have been linked to the risk of functional limitation/disability. Research has shown that these institutions influence the availability of health-related social and economic resources, exposure to health-compromising environments, health and illness behaviors, access to health care, and a variety of other factors that affect women's and men's risks of functional limitation and disability over the life course (Dupre 2007; Institute of Medicine 1993; Kahn and Pearlin 2006;Lynch 2006;Mirowsky et al 2002).…”
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“…Disparities in the risk of functional limitation/disability, including differences between men and women, are rooted in structural arrangements that privilege certain groups over others. Differential patterns of participation in social institutions, including the educational (Ross and Wu 1995;Zimmer and House 2003), economic (House et al 2005;Phelan 1995, 1996;Ross and Mirowsky 1995), marriage and family (Goldman et al 1995;Ross et al 1990;Umberson et al 2006), and criminal justice systems (London and Myers 2006;Massoglia 2008;Schnittker 2007) have been linked to the risk of functional limitation/disability. Research has shown that these institutions influence the availability of health-related social and economic resources, exposure to health-compromising environments, health and illness behaviors, access to health care, and a variety of other factors that affect women's and men's risks of functional limitation and disability over the life course (Dupre 2007; Institute of Medicine 1993; Kahn and Pearlin 2006;Lynch 2006;Mirowsky et al 2002).…”
mentioning
“…Life-course theory is an effective way to address the health of aging offenders (London & Myers, 2006;Piquero et al, 2007). Most people anticipate an ''expected life course'' (Moen & Spencer, 2006).…”
Section: Theoretical Basismentioning
“…There is a complex relationship between race, health disparity, and incarceration; it is difficult to determine whether a causal relationship exists between these factors, and if so, in which direction causality points (Keen & Jacobs, 2009;London & Myers, 2006;Massoglia, 2008). Nonetheless, given the composition of the population and the abundant literature on health disparities by race (Barr, 2008;Cooper & Kaufman, 1998;Gravlee, 2009;Kaufman, 2008), the argument that inmates experience poorer health than their free counterparts is self-evident.…”
Section: Inmate Demographicsmentioning
“…Much of the evidence suggests that incarceration adversely affects employment opportunity, educational attainment, marital stability, school performance for inmates' children, and mental and physical health for inmates and their families both during confinement and long after imprisonment ends (Arditti, Lambert-Shute, & Joest, 2003;Clear, 2005;King, 1993;22 J. F. Linder and F. J. Meyers La Vigne, Naser, Brooks, & Castro, 2005;London & Myers, 2006;Massoglia, 2008). Social workers have key roles to play inside and outside of the institution.…”
Section: Family Relationshipsmentioning