2016
DOI: 10.18632/aging.100892
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Abstract: Mammalian ageing features biological attrition evident at cellular, genetic and epigenetic levels. Mutation of mitochondrial DNA, and nuclear DNA methylation changes are well established correlates of ageing. The methylation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a new and incompletely described phenomenon with unknown biological control and significance. Here we describe the bisulphite sequencing of mtDNA from 82 individuals aged 18‐91 years. We detected low and variable levels of mtDNA methylation at 54 of 133 CpG … Show more

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Cited by 41 publications
(36 citation statements)
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References 24 publications
(27 reference statements)
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“…An interesting study by Byun et al showed a higher mtDNA methylation level in workers highly exposed to airborne pollutants compared to low airborne pollutant exposed subjects (108). In line with this finding, in a cohort of 81 individuals aged 18-91, methylation levels of the mitochondria gene 12S rRNA inversely correlated with age suggesting that mtDNA methylation may represent an epigenetic marker of ageing (109). In the retina of diabetic mice mtDNA methylation was found associated with mtDNA damage characterized by increased base mismatches and hypermethylated cytosines.…”
Section: Epigenetic Remodeling Of Mitochondrial Dnamentioning
confidence: 76%
“…An interesting study by Byun et al showed a higher mtDNA methylation level in workers highly exposed to airborne pollutants compared to low airborne pollutant exposed subjects (108). In line with this finding, in a cohort of 81 individuals aged 18-91, methylation levels of the mitochondria gene 12S rRNA inversely correlated with age suggesting that mtDNA methylation may represent an epigenetic marker of ageing (109). In the retina of diabetic mice mtDNA methylation was found associated with mtDNA damage characterized by increased base mismatches and hypermethylated cytosines.…”
Section: Epigenetic Remodeling Of Mitochondrial Dnamentioning
confidence: 76%
“…representing the key feature of POD [8,26,27]. Recently, mtDNA methylation, which regulates mtDNA gene expression and replication and thus directly affects the structure and function of mitochondrion, has been proposed as a cause of ageing and many neurodegenerative diseases and may be a valuable epigenetic marker and therapeutic target [17][18][19][20]28]. Illumina sequencing of 82 human blood samples indicated that the methylation levels at 54 CpG sites in the mitochondrial genome varied according to age and that hypomethylation of two of these CpG sites was signi cantly correlated with chronological age [20].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Recently, mtDNA methylation, which regulates mtDNA gene expression and replication and thus directly affects the structure and function of mitochondrion, has been proposed as a cause of ageing and many neurodegenerative diseases and may be a valuable epigenetic marker and therapeutic target [17][18][19][20]28]. Illumina sequencing of 82 human blood samples indicated that the methylation levels at 54 CpG sites in the mitochondrial genome varied according to age and that hypomethylation of two of these CpG sites was signi cantly correlated with chronological age [20]. A dynamic pattern including both increases and decreases in methylation levels at various sites of mtDNA in human and mouse brains, i.e., the mtDNA methylation drift, contributes to the pathogenic mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease [17,18].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Ageing is characterized by both inflammation and oxidative stress as well as a gradual change in the DNA methylome, which lead to increased methylation within the CpG islands and a loss of methylation at sites outside [23,156]. This genome-wide dysregulation of DNA methylation patterns correlates with chronological age in various tissues [161][162][163][164][165][166] and changes in gene expression [167,168]. The correlation between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) methylation changes and ageing are less well understood, but a recent study has suggested two mtDNA CpG sites (M1215 and M1313), located within the 12S ribosomal RNA gene, as plausible epigenetic markers of ageing [169].…”
Section: Accelerated Biological Ageing and The Epigenetic Clockmentioning
confidence: 99%