1994
DOI: 10.1177/009539979402600104
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Abstract: Reorganizers of the state in Australia, New Zealand, Denmark, and Sweden during the 1980s tried to separate policy-making from the production of welfare and other services by introducing market disciplines and competition. Fiscal bureaucrats, afraid of rising fiscal deficits and public debt, sought to control what they saw as rent-seeking behavior and agent abuse of principals in the public sector They argued these changes would reduce incentives for collective rent-seeking behavior and prevent shirking. Fisca… Show more

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Cited by 92 publications
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References 12 publications
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“…This movement, in Kamensky's (1996) estimation, "seems to have evolved during the past 10 to 15 years, largely among practitioners of public administration in different places in the world but with many similar tenets" (p. 248). Those tenets, whether articulated in New Zealand (Boston, 1991), America (Wilson, 1994), or Denmark (Schwartz, 1994), closely resemble the concepts of public choice theory (Savas, 1987). The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (1995) and Osborne and Gaebler (1992) suggest that the movement originated simultaneously in the early 1980s as part of national efforts to reposition economies in the face of increased global competition and as strategies for coping with budgetary cutbacks.…”
Section: The Reinventing Government Contextmentioning
confidence: 91%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…This movement, in Kamensky's (1996) estimation, "seems to have evolved during the past 10 to 15 years, largely among practitioners of public administration in different places in the world but with many similar tenets" (p. 248). Those tenets, whether articulated in New Zealand (Boston, 1991), America (Wilson, 1994), or Denmark (Schwartz, 1994), closely resemble the concepts of public choice theory (Savas, 1987). The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (1995) and Osborne and Gaebler (1992) suggest that the movement originated simultaneously in the early 1980s as part of national efforts to reposition economies in the face of increased global competition and as strategies for coping with budgetary cutbacks.…”
Section: The Reinventing Government Contextmentioning
confidence: 91%
“…For example, China's current campaign for membership in the World Trade Organization has a clear economic agenda, but it also has significant political implications involving increased openness and momentum for the reform movement. Kamensky (1996) and Schwartz (1994) analyze the Western experience as more based in the economy. Kamensky (1996) emphasizes the "massive change underway in the structure of the economy" (p. 117); Schwartz goes further, saying, "The old administrative state is likely to lose further ground to the market-driven state" (p. 73).…”
Section: Comparative Analysismentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Moreover, the two authors add to these approaches, suggesting that rent-seeking activity implies the captive state concept, as well as any other attempt of public officials, politicians, and even individuals, of making profits from the functioning of the state apparatus. Other authors present rent-seeking behavior as the attempts of some individuals or groups (such as certain politicians, public officials, or trade unions) of imposing adoption of some fiscal-budgetary or regulatory measures to a country's government, allowing them to obtain financial gains or other material advantages at the expense of the general mass of taxpayers, of consumers, or of other types of groups with which the beneficiaries can be in economic competition [2,38]. At the same time, the taxpayers financing these services do not practically benefit from them and they cannot avoid paying those respective taxes, since they are too many to easily express their interests publicly [39].…”
Section: Literature Reviewmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…As recession took root in Denmark, a Social Democratic Minister of Finance talked about his country approaching an economic abyss unless drastic measures were taken to redress the situation. Eventually, however, it fell to a Liberal-Conservative government to introduce a tough program of economic reconstruction, coupled with a set of public sector reforms (Schwartz 1994a(Schwartz , 1994b. The latter involved both an ambitious deregulation policy and a plan for privatization and contracting-out.…”
Section: A Tale Of Two Countriesmentioning
confidence: 99%