2015
DOI: 10.18632/aging.100808
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Abstract: Cancer cells grow in highly complex stromal microenvironments, which through metabolic remodelling, catabolism, autophagy and inflammation nurture them and are able to facilitate metastasis and resistance to therapy. However, these changes in the metabolic profile of stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts and their impact on cancer initiation, progression and metastasis are not well-known. This is the first study to provide a comprehensive proteomic portrait of the azathioprine and taxol-induced catabolic state… Show more

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Cited by 28 publications
(34 citation statements)
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References 32 publications
(47 reference statements)
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“…Hypoxia deregulates proteins with roles in redox homeostasis. We found a cluster of differentially expressed proteins involved in cellular redox homeostasis, including endoplasmic reticulum resident protein 29 (ERP29) 34 , Ras-related protein R-Ras (RRAS) 35 , peroxiredoxin-1 (PRDX1), glutathione disulfide reductase (GSR), protein disulfide isomerase 4 (PDIA4), ERO1-like protein alpha (ERO1L/ERO1A) 36 , isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2) 37 and 6-phosphogluconolactonase (PGLS) 38 . The deregulations of these proteins prompted us to further evaluate whether hypoxia indeed induced changes in ROS levels in OS cells.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Hypoxia deregulates proteins with roles in redox homeostasis. We found a cluster of differentially expressed proteins involved in cellular redox homeostasis, including endoplasmic reticulum resident protein 29 (ERP29) 34 , Ras-related protein R-Ras (RRAS) 35 , peroxiredoxin-1 (PRDX1), glutathione disulfide reductase (GSR), protein disulfide isomerase 4 (PDIA4), ERO1-like protein alpha (ERO1L/ERO1A) 36 , isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2) 37 and 6-phosphogluconolactonase (PGLS) 38 . The deregulations of these proteins prompted us to further evaluate whether hypoxia indeed induced changes in ROS levels in OS cells.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Personalized therapy based on the characteristics of the individual tumor could improve survival and decrease adverse effects induced by unnecessary therapy. The stromal environment contributes to tumor angiogenesis, which supplies the oxygen and nutrients needed for tumor growth and progression . Anti‐angiogenic therapy, for example with bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against vascular‐endothelial growth factor, can therefore play an important role in treating patients with increased angiogenesis.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The stromal environment contributes to tumor angiogenesis, which supplies the oxygen and nutrients needed for tumor growth and progression. 10 Anti-angiogenic therapy, for example with bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against vascularendothelial growth factor, can therefore play an important role in treating patients with increased angiogenesis. Therapy targeting the TME could make a difference in survival, especially for the stroma-high group.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The high-energy compounds (pyruvic acid/ lactic acid) generated in glycolysis were either supplied to fast-growing tumor cells or used to maintain the upregulated autophagy state of CAFs themselves. 43,44 In summary, this study provided evidences that colorectal cancer cells could induce oxidative stress in microenvironmental fibroblasts, which were then undergone metabolic changes, including increased expression of glycolytic enzymes, reduced KREBS cycle enzymes and autophagy. Oxidative stress inhibitors and autophagy inhibitors could inhibit the metabolic reprogramming between tumor cells and fibroblasts.…”
Section: Ccd-18-co Cell Viability (%)mentioning
confidence: 74%