Industrial Applications 2010
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-11458-8_3
View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|
Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
2

Citation Types

0
4
0

Year Published

2014
2014
2020
2020

Publication Types

Select...
2

Relationship

0
2

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 3 publications
(4 citation statements)
references
References 56 publications
0
4
0
Order By: Relevance
“…In the last decades, the amount of barley used for brewing has significantly increased (Zhou, 2010). Two-row spring barley with large grains is preferred for malting because of higher starch content and lower protein content compared to sixrow winter barley (Hartmeier and Reiss, 2011). Malting quality (MQ) traits are important in spring barley, since they can be directly related to the quality of brewed beer and the amount of alcohol that can be made from the grain.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…In the last decades, the amount of barley used for brewing has significantly increased (Zhou, 2010). Two-row spring barley with large grains is preferred for malting because of higher starch content and lower protein content compared to sixrow winter barley (Hartmeier and Reiss, 2011). Malting quality (MQ) traits are important in spring barley, since they can be directly related to the quality of brewed beer and the amount of alcohol that can be made from the grain.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The first stage of the brewing process is hydrolysis of the starch into fermentable sugars and the second stage is the conversion of these sugars into alcohol and carbon dioxide (Østergaard and Olsen, 2011). The first stage often involves malting, that is a germination of grains, and mashing, which is an enzymatic process (Hartmeier and Reiss, 2011). Numerous metabolic processes are involved in germination with final result in distinct and time-dependent alterations of the metabolite profiles (Frank et al, 2011).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The four main fermentable sugars (sucrose, glucose, maltose and maltotriose) present in wort are utilized sequentially, with some degree of overlap . Depending on the properties of the yeast strain, some oligosaccharides with more than two glucose molecules, for example, maltotetraose, can also be hydrolysed and fermented to ethanol . Reducing sugars in the wort and fermentation broth, in this work, are described as the concentration of maltose.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Glucose syrup was used as an adjunct to elevate the level of ethanol. Fermentable sugars are converted into ethanol and carbon dioxide by yeast cells . On a stoichiometric basis, 1 g maltose or 1 g glucose should be theoretically converted into 0.54 or 0.51 g ethanol, respectively.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%