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“…Although not everyone might have a clinical problem that warrants treatment (Rozental and Carlbring, 2014), studies have revealed significant relationships between self-report measures of procrastination, depression, anxiety, stress, and quality of life, with average correlations being in the moderate range (van Eerde, 2003b; Steel, 2007; Beutel et al, 2016). Moreover, procrastination has been linked to perfectionistic concerns (Sirois et al, 2017), rumination and lowered mood (Flett et al, 2016), and excessive worry and generalized anxiety disorder (Stober and Joormann, 2001). Similarly, a number of investigations on the physical and well-being aspects of procrastination have shown that it can affect the ability to initiate and engage in so-called health behaviors, e.g., medical checkups, diets, and exercise (Sirois et al, 2003; 2007).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
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“…Although not everyone might have a clinical problem that warrants treatment (Rozental and Carlbring, 2014), studies have revealed significant relationships between self-report measures of procrastination, depression, anxiety, stress, and quality of life, with average correlations being in the moderate range (van Eerde, 2003b; Steel, 2007; Beutel et al, 2016). Moreover, procrastination has been linked to perfectionistic concerns (Sirois et al, 2017), rumination and lowered mood (Flett et al, 2016), and excessive worry and generalized anxiety disorder (Stober and Joormann, 2001). Similarly, a number of investigations on the physical and well-being aspects of procrastination have shown that it can affect the ability to initiate and engage in so-called health behaviors, e.g., medical checkups, diets, and exercise (Sirois et al, 2003; 2007).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…Negative mood is a common focus of this temporal trade-off; the source of this negative mood may, however, vary. For example, negative affective states can arise from the anticipation of having to complete an aversive task (Flett, Stainton, Hewitt, Sherry, & Lay, 2012;Solomon & Rothblum, 1984), or more generally from the negative selfevaluations and cognitions that are pervasive with procrastination (Flett, Haghbin, & Pychyl, 2016;McCown et al, 2012;Sirois, 2014c), and which may become heightened in the context of having to complete an undesirable task.…”
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“…A second strength is our comprehensive assessment. Although procrastination is not classified as a mental disorder, there are studies showing that procrastination can be correlated to generalized anxiety disorder (Stöber and Joormann, 2001) or rumination and depression (Flett et al, 2016). Other studies found procrastination to be linked to further negative outcomes such as higher stress, fatigue, illness susceptibility and worse performance in exams (Beutel et al, 2016; Höcker et al, 2013; Stead et al, 2010; Steel, 2007; Tice and Baumeister, 1997).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning