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“…Bouton, 1958), and Gibson et al agreed with Willis (1950) that the source of these tumours is the elongated pigment cells of the pia mater. While it could be postulated that the tumour described here originated from such cells of the pia mater, one of us has frequently observed the presence of similar pigment-containing cells in the pars nervosa of normal pituitary glands (Fig.…”
Section: Discoid Bodiesmentioning
“…As almost every individual can boast of several small pigmented cutaneous naevi, cases have not been included in this series unless the naevi were either extremely large or unusually numerous. The single exception to this is the patient described by Bouton (1958), who had no localized skin naevi but whose skin showed a marked generalized brownish pigmentation similar to that seen in Addison's disease. Unfortunately no description of the histological features of the skin is given in this case report.…”
Section: Discausionmentioning
“…In all the reported cases there has been a diffuse melanoblastic infiltration in the meninges in addition to the localized malignant tumour, and it is thought that in all cases the tumour has arisen from a preexisting meningeal melanosis. Thus Bouton (1958) has written that 'it is not unreasonable to assume that melanosis, diffuise in the majority ofcases, always precedes the development of malignancy and must be considered as an essential pre-requisite for primary melanomas of the meninges'. It could be argued that this meningeal infiltration represents a spread throughout the meninges from the primary malignant tumour, but in many cases areas of clearly benign melanoblastic infiltration can be found, implying that pre-existing benign melanosis preceded the appearance of the malignant tumour.…”
Section: Discausionmentioning
“…This communication, as well as the papers of Bouton (1958) and of Kiel et al (1961) include thorough discussions concerning the criteria for distinguishing between primary and secondary malignant leptomeningeal melanomatosis. Since a detailed search for a possible primary tumour does not seem to have been made in our case, and since the patient had previously exhibited multiple hairy cutaneous naevi, we cannot claim that our case belongs to the small group of primary malignant, melanomas.…”
Section: Fig 1 a Myelogram Interpreted As Araehnoiditismentioning
“…It has been argued that leptomeningeal hyperpigmentation must be considered an essential prerequisite for the diagnosis of a primary malignant cerebral melanoma on the grounds that the tumour may be secondary to a lesion at some other site, even if this is not found at necropsy. (Bouton, 1958;Fox et al, 1964). The argument whether, in the absence of malignancy elsewhere in the body, a cerebral melanoma is primary or secondary is impossible to resolve, and this difficulty is further underlined by the patient reported by Lua (1914).…”
Section: Case Reportmentioning