1949
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.1949.01530050011002
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Primary Irritants and Sensitizers Used in Fabrication of Footwear

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1950
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Cited by 18 publications
(6 citation statements)
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“…4 ) Chemicals associated with leather, rubber, and adhesives have long been recognized as potentially sensitizing agents. 5,6 The most common allergens associated with ACD of the feet vary among studies but are typically those involved in leather or rubber processing. 1,[7][8][9][10] The warm moist environment and occlusion provided by shoes are thought to potentiate the development of ACD.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…4 ) Chemicals associated with leather, rubber, and adhesives have long been recognized as potentially sensitizing agents. 5,6 The most common allergens associated with ACD of the feet vary among studies but are typically those involved in leather or rubber processing. 1,[7][8][9][10] The warm moist environment and occlusion provided by shoes are thought to potentiate the development of ACD.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This finding could be attributed to the fact that little is known about the tanning agents and dyes used. Much information is unknown or kept secret by the shoe manufacturers (12).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In four of the patients (also both patients with the clinical picture of a shoe derm atitis) patch tests with mesulphen 8% were strongly positive while reactions with all other materials from Tineafax ointment were negative. In the second place, in all patients a scries of materials needing exam ination for cases of shoe derm atitis was investigated by means of patch tests: for instance dyes, phenole resins (de Vries, 1964), formaldehyde, chromium compounds, rubber chemicals (some accelerators and anti oxydants, Gaul and Underwood, 1949;Blank and Miller, 1952) and some components of adhesives as para-tertiary-butyl-phenole (M ol ten, 1958;Molten and van Aerssen, 1962). In the four patients having no shoe derm atitis all reactions were negative.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%