2000
DOI: 10.1007/s004360050054
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Abstract: Field investigations were performed over a 2- or 3-year period at five sites in central France to determine the prevalence of Haplometra cylindracea infection in three species of adult Lymnaea, and to compare it with that of Fasciola hepatica infection recorded in the same snails. L. glabra, L. palustris, and L. truncatula harboured Haplometra larval forms but the prevalence of this infection varied according to the site and snail species studied. The prevalences in May ranged over 0-66.9% in L. glabra, 3-7.7%… Show more

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Cited by 10 publications
(12 citation statements)
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“…Co-infections between C. daubneyi and F. hepatica within G. truncatula were recorded, however, these were rare as was seen in comprehensive studies in France (Rondelaud et al, 2004, Rondelaud et al, 2016). This lack of co-infections could be an indication of competition occurring in the field, with secondary infecting fluke species failing to establish in the snail, or its successful infection leading to snail death due to internal pressures (Goumghar et al, 2000). Competition between C. daubneyi and F. hepatica has already been demonstrated in laboratory studies, with interspecies predation, competition for nutrients and changing biochemical composition of snail tissue all antagonising factors observed when co-infections of both species were initiated (Chipev et al, 1985, Rondelaud et al, 2007).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Information on H. cylindracea in the UK is scarce, and thus it is unclear if the relatively high levels observed in these Welsh farms differ from its prevalence both historically and across various regions of the UK. In France, overall prevalence has been shown to be low (Mage et al, 2002, Rondelaud et al, 2016), although levels within individual habitats have been recorded as high as 31.5% (Goumghar et al, 2000). In the latter study, F. hepatica prevalence within G. truncatula populations was shown to be lower in habitats where H. cylindracea was present, while Whitelaw and Fawcett (1982) suggested that high levels of H. cylindracea within a Scottish farm’s G. truncatula population might have been the cause of the absence of F. hepatica in those snails.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…According to Rondelaud et al (2009), the prevalence of natural infections in this snail may be high (up to 78%). However, natural fluctuations of this infection rate according to snail habitat, the year of study, and also the month of the year were reported by Hourdin et al (1991) and Goumghar et al (2000). In swampy meadows in Haute-Vienne, cercarial shedding of H. cylindracea occurred in April-May and September-October as those of Fasciola hepatica and Paramphistomum daubneyi (Rondelaud et al , 2009).…”
mentioning
confidence: 86%
“…The life cycle of the first parasite, C. daubneyi, was close to that of F. hepatica because both species often infected the same cattle and the same local snail host (G. truncatula) in central France (Szmidt-Adjidé et al 2000;Mage et al 2002). The second parasite, Haplometra cylindracea, had a different definitive host (frogs) but also used G. truncatula for development of its larval forms (Moukrim et al 1993;Goumghar et al 2000;Vignoles et al 2007Vignoles et al , 2011. Experimental infections of G. truncatula with C. daubneyi and natural infections of the same lymnaeid with H. cylindracea were thus followed under laboratory conditions to subject snails every week outdoors to a thermal shock under natural light during the patent period.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…The first two groups came from communities in which H. cylindracea was never found and were used as controls. In contrast, the four others were known from the past 20 years for their frequent natural infections with H. cylindracea (prevalence, up to 70% of snails; Goumghar et al 2000). Three hundred and twenty snails, measuring 3-3.5 mm in height and belonging to the autumn generation, were collected from their habitats in October.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%