2016
DOI: 10.1097/wnr.0000000000000576
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Abstract: Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are impaired in face recognition and emotional expression identification. According to current models, there are at least three levels of face processing: first order (two eyes, above a nose, which is above a mouth), second order (the relative distance between features), and holistic (ability to recognize as faces images that lack distinctive facial features). Some studies have reported deficits in configural and holistic processing in individuals with ASD. We in… Show more

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Cited by 13 publications
(7 citation statements)
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“…The FIE refers to the observation that while inversion disrupts the recognition of all objects, face inversion produces a greater impairment in face recognition than the impairment produced by the inversion of other images (Bruyer, 2011; Yin, 1969). Early behavioral findings on the FIE in ASD indicated a reduced FIE (Gauthier, Klaiman, & Schultz, 2009; Teunisse & De Gelder, 2003), but more recent studies found no evidence of consistent differences in FIE between ASD and typically developing (TD) individuals but more recent studies found no evidence of consistent differences in FIE between ASD and typically developing (TD) individuals (Tang et al, 2015; Tavares, Mouga, Oliveira, & Castelo‐Branco, 2016; Weigelt et al, 2012). Given the somewhat inconsistent findings, the FIE has not garnered significant attention in studies of ASD.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The FIE refers to the observation that while inversion disrupts the recognition of all objects, face inversion produces a greater impairment in face recognition than the impairment produced by the inversion of other images (Bruyer, 2011; Yin, 1969). Early behavioral findings on the FIE in ASD indicated a reduced FIE (Gauthier, Klaiman, & Schultz, 2009; Teunisse & De Gelder, 2003), but more recent studies found no evidence of consistent differences in FIE between ASD and typically developing (TD) individuals but more recent studies found no evidence of consistent differences in FIE between ASD and typically developing (TD) individuals (Tang et al, 2015; Tavares, Mouga, Oliveira, & Castelo‐Branco, 2016; Weigelt et al, 2012). Given the somewhat inconsistent findings, the FIE has not garnered significant attention in studies of ASD.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Quantitatively, the majority of reviewed studies reported reduced individual face recognition accuracy among individuals with ASD but no systematic difference in response time. Qualitatively, many studies provided evidence for the use of different face recognition strategies in individuals with ASD, as indicated by markers of atypical individual face recognition such as a reduced inversion effect (Hedley et al 2015; Rose et al 2007; Tavares et al 2016; Teunisse and de Gelder 2003).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Unfortunately, thus far, electrophysiological studies of children or adults with ASD have failed to provide consistent evidence of abnormal N170 amplitude, latency or scalp topography in response to face stimuli (e.g. Dawson et al 2005; Kang et al 2018; Naumann et al 2018; Tavares et al 2016; Webb et al 2010). Although a recent meta-analysis pointed to a small but significant delay in N170 latency in ASD compared to neurotypicals (Kang et al 2018), this effect may reflect the generally slower processing of meaningful, even non-social, visual stimuli, and is quite unspecific, being found in a wide variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders regardless of diagnosis (Feuerriegel et al 2015).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Qualitative differences are assessed by markers of typical face processing, such as the inversion effect (5)(6)(7)(8). However, there is inconsistency between studies, even while using the same tasks [e.g., (4,(6)(7)(8)(9)(10)(11)(12)]. This might be due to the large heterogeneity in ASD but also to the explicit character of behavioral testing, which allows other factors, such as attention, motivation, task understanding, and compensatory strategies, to affect performance.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The majority of electroencephalography studies in children and adults with ASD focused on the N170, a negative eventrelated potential (ERP) peaking at about 170 ms over occipitotemporal sites after the sudden onset of a face stimulus [for review see (13,14); for "M170" in magnetoencephalography see (15)]. These studies failed to provide consistent evidence of abnormal N170 amplitude, latency, or scalp topography in response to face stimuli (7,(16)(17)(18)(19)(20)(21)(22)(23)(24). Despite acknowledging this inconsistency, a recent meta-analysis by Kang et al (25) in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging identified a small but significant delay in N170 latency in ASD compared with neurotypical individuals.…”
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confidence: 99%