2009
DOI: 10.1111/j.1525-1594.2009.00888.x View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: The aim of this work is to analyze endothelium nitric oxide (NO) release in patients undergoing continuous or pulsatile flow cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Nine patients operated under continuous flow CPB, and nine patients on pulsatile flow CPB were enrolled. Plasma samples were withdrawn for the chemiluminescence detection of nitrite and nitrate. Moreover the cellular component was withdrawn for the detection of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in the erythrocytes, and an estimation of systemic inflammato… Show more

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“…4 PP is well known to enhance arterial wall stress, related to flow speed acceleration and turbulence, and results in an increase in nitric oxide production. 15 Nitric oxide-induced vasodilatation could also have contributed to the elevation of PV back to pre-CPB levels.…”
Section: Nfb Fer Cop I Cvp Pv and Ttwmentioning
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“…4 PP is well known to enhance arterial wall stress, related to flow speed acceleration and turbulence, and results in an increase in nitric oxide production. 15 Nitric oxide-induced vasodilatation could also have contributed to the elevation of PV back to pre-CPB levels.…”
Section: Nfb Fer Cop I Cvp Pv and Ttwmentioning
“…[11][12][13] Also, the continuation of IABP-pulsed perfusion during CPB has been advocated, because it improves whole body perfusion, preserves endothelial nitric oxide release, and reduces the coagulative and fibrinolytic response. [14][15][16] In addition, such a combined perfusion technique contributes to better preservation of the lungs, 17 the splanchnic organs, and the kidneys. 13 To the best of our knowledge, no randomized clinical or experimental trials have evaluated microvascular fluid homeostasis when pulsed CPB flow is generated with an IABP in automatic 80 beats/min mode.…”
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“…The frequency of the pulsatile perfusion was 1.7 Hz (i.e., 100 cycles/minute), consistent with the estimated heart rate, and was able to generate pulse pressures of 25–90 mm Hg, compared with only 2–15 mm Hg with non-pulsatile perfusion (Sanderson et al, 1972). Mean arterial pressure and blood flow, however, were approximately 50 and 12% lower with pulsatile perfusion, but peripheral vascular resistance was also 57% lower; increased shear stress with pulsatile perfusion increases endothelial nitric oxide production (Nakano et al, 2000; Lanzarone et al, 2009), subsequently decreasing resistance (Nakano et al, 2000). The observed decrease in neuronal damage indicates that pulsatile flow improves perfusion and oxygenation of vital tissue, even with lower perfusion pressures.…”
Section: “Friend”mentioning
“…Some of these studies have demonstrated the role of nitric oxide-induced vasodilation and improved oxygen delivery at high oscillatory frequencies (Nakano et al, 2000; Lanzarone et al, 2009; Uryash et al, 2009; Adams et al, 2011). Additionally, forcing oscillations in arterial pressure at 0.1 Hz has also been shown to elicit an acute antihypertensive effect (over the first 8 h of a 24 h recording) in a dog model via liberation of nitric oxide (Nafz et al, 2000), which could improve tissue perfusion and oxygenation.…”
Section: “Friend”mentioning
“…Others showed that distinct flow conditions affect endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression, prostacyclin and proinflammatory protein production, and the induction of vascular adhesion molecules (22,27). In particular, pulsatile flow increases endothelial nitric oxide production compared with nonpulsatile flow (21,26).…”
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