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“…However, other studies have reported opposite findings. For example, Ward and Wainwright (1989) reported that prenatal stress actually decreased the adverse effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on rat offspring. Studies investigating the interactive effects of stress and alcohol in nonhuman primates have demonstrated that stress reduces the peak concentration of blood alcohol levels and alters the time course of alcohol concentration in plasma (inducing a later peak time).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
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“…However, other studies have reported opposite findings. For example, Ward and Wainwright (1989) reported that prenatal stress actually decreased the adverse effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on rat offspring. Studies investigating the interactive effects of stress and alcohol in nonhuman primates have demonstrated that stress reduces the peak concentration of blood alcohol levels and alters the time course of alcohol concentration in plasma (inducing a later peak time).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…Other studies, however, have reported opposite findings. For example, Ward and Wainwright (1989) reported that prenatal stress actually decreased the adverse effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on sensorimotor development in rats. We recently reported a slight increase in fetal loss associated with exposure to both prenatal stress and prenatal alcohol in rhesus monkeys (Schneider et al, 1997).…”
mentioning
“…We identified 16 unique exogenous chemicals of which the most commonly reported were smoking, with 24 human studies [26,29,[31][32][33][34][35][36][37][44][45][46][47][48][49][50][51][52][53][54][55][56][57][58], and alcohol, with 3 human [32,36,55] and 11 animal studies [59][60][61][62][63][64][65][66][67][68][69] (Table 4). There were four studies each on air pollution (3 human [27,28,70], 1 animal [71]), lead (1 human [72], 4 animal [73][74][75][76]), and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (4 animal [77]…”
Section: Included Studiesmentioning