Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
3
1
1

Citation Types

0
5
0

Year Published

2010
2010
2020
2020

Publication Types

Select...
2

Relationship

0
2

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 4 publications
(5 citation statements)
references
References 0 publications
0
5
0
Order By: Relevance
“…We hypothesize that the caudal fin also controls yaw in other Ostraciidae species, the closely related deepwater boxfishes (Aracanidae) and probably also in other relatively rigid-bodied tetraodontiform fishes such as smooth pufferfishes (Tetraodontidae) [33,35] and porcupinefishes (Diodontidae) [37,65] exhibiting median-paired fin locomotion [12,16,17,66,67] to increase manoeuvrability. This has also indicatively been shown in previous studies 28,33,35,37]. Blake [19] qualitatively linked posture and state of the caudal fin to yaw, roll and pitch movements for the longhorn cowfish Lactoria cornuta (Linnaeus, 1758) and the humpback turretfish Tetrosomus gibbosus (Linnaeus, 1758).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 3 more Smart Citations
“…We hypothesize that the caudal fin also controls yaw in other Ostraciidae species, the closely related deepwater boxfishes (Aracanidae) and probably also in other relatively rigid-bodied tetraodontiform fishes such as smooth pufferfishes (Tetraodontidae) [33,35] and porcupinefishes (Diodontidae) [37,65] exhibiting median-paired fin locomotion [12,16,17,66,67] to increase manoeuvrability. This has also indicatively been shown in previous studies 28,33,35,37]. Blake [19] qualitatively linked posture and state of the caudal fin to yaw, roll and pitch movements for the longhorn cowfish Lactoria cornuta (Linnaeus, 1758) and the humpback turretfish Tetrosomus gibbosus (Linnaeus, 1758).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The caudal fin has been hypothesized many times to play a central role in controlling turning manoeuvres in many fish species as well as in boxfishes [e.g. 6,13,[19][20][21][28][29][30][31][32][33][34][35][36][37]. This course stabilization was shown by measuring yaw torque at different body angles (α) in a flow tank with a physical model of O. cubicus with an attached caudal peduncle and caudal fin.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 2 more Smart Citations
“…In contrast diodontids, ostraciids and molids have never been reported as having any burrowing habits. Tetraodontids, diodontids and ostraciids are all rigid‐bodied, median and paired‐fin swimmers (Wiktorowicz et al , 2007). Their modes of locomotion were once categorized as tetraodontiform, diodontiform and ostraciiform, respectively (Breder, 1926), but they are similar to one another in that, unlike ordinary fishes, the body and caudal fin do not play a dominant role in producing propulsion for swimming.…”
Section: Reductive Evolutionmentioning
confidence: 99%