2007
DOI: 10.1055/s-2007-965325
View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Endoscopic vein harvesting seems to be superior to minimally invasive vein harvesting in terms of a significant reduction of residual leg oedema, pain intensity and particularly saphenous neuropathy in the postoperative and midterm follow-up.

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2

Citation Types

0
2
0

Year Published

2015
2015
2016
2016

Publication Types

Select...
2

Relationship

0
2

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 6 publications
(2 citation statements)
references
References 15 publications
(28 reference statements)
0
2
0
Order By: Relevance
“…A possible explanation is that saphaenous nerve injury can occur as a result of surgical handling or postoperatively from compression caused by subcutaneous suturing. Relevant literature addressed alternative techniques to avoid this injury (Bonde et al., ; Allen et al., ; Simek et al., ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A possible explanation is that saphaenous nerve injury can occur as a result of surgical handling or postoperatively from compression caused by subcutaneous suturing. Relevant literature addressed alternative techniques to avoid this injury (Bonde et al., ; Allen et al., ; Simek et al., ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The higher percentage of complications in the OVH than the EVH group was accounted for by more frequent early lymphatic drainage. Thus, in the EVH group, according to the findings of previous studies, lymphatic drainage was observed in approximately 10–12 % of patients [ 18 ]. However, in the present study, it was only observed in 4.5 % of patients.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 84%