2019
DOI: 10.2478/cerce-2019-0014
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Abstract: Post-harvest losses, particularly along the rice value chain, have been highlighted as a major source of reduction in revenue among the value chain actors. It is therefore imperative that empirical assessment of the magnitude and determinants be investigated, so as to be able to provide a reliable policy stand that can help reduce these losses. Patigi and Edu local government areas were purposively sampled from Kwara state, Nigeria, since they are the major producers of rice in the State. Data were gathered th… Show more

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“…Postharvest losses in rice may be quantitative or qualitative. Quantitative losses result in weight or volume reduction in the potential yield, while qualitative losses result in a reduction in the value of the usable rice owing to physical and chemical changes, such as poor appearance, poor taste, and unpleasant odor [35]. Nonetheless, harvest losses are usually measured as actual physical losses (i.e., quantitative losses).…”
Section: Estimation Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Postharvest losses in rice may be quantitative or qualitative. Quantitative losses result in weight or volume reduction in the potential yield, while qualitative losses result in a reduction in the value of the usable rice owing to physical and chemical changes, such as poor appearance, poor taste, and unpleasant odor [35]. Nonetheless, harvest losses are usually measured as actual physical losses (i.e., quantitative losses).…”
Section: Estimation Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…As one of the world's three leading food crops, rice feeds almost half of the world's population, making it the most consumed cereal grain [33], especially in low-and lowermiddle-income countries [34]. Among rice farmers, processors, and marketers, rice farmers experience the highest loss [35,36]. Losses on farms reduce farmers' incomes, and for farmers in low-income countries living on the edge of hunger, these losses are closely associated with food insecurity [37,38].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Losses particularly along the value chain [1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18] has been highlighted as a major source of lost in revenue and productivity among value chain actors as both quantitative and qualitative losses occur during any of the stages [19]. This is an indication that critical attention need to be given to the postharvest value chain to reduce loss in productivity and make rice production a sustainable venture.…”
Section: Understanding the Rice Postharvest Value-chain In Africamentioning
confidence: 99%