2020
DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12968
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Post‐fire regeneration strategies in a frequently burned Cerrado community

Abstract: Aim: Fire is a natural disturbance in many ecosystems throughout the world where plant populations can persist by the resprouting of individuals and/or by recruiting from seeds. We evaluated the post-fire regeneration response for 41 coexisting species, including grasses, forbs, and shrubs, from an open Cerrado community (campo sujo) in Central Brazil. Location: The study was conducted at the Reserva Natural Serra do Tombador (RNST) in Central Brazil. The vegetation of the study area is characterized by a cont… Show more

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Cited by 43 publications
(44 citation statements)
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“…It is necessary to investigate whether the subterranean structures of C. parviflora allow, in addition to resprouting, some type of vegetative propagation. Although heat tolerance is an important trait that enables germination when favorable conditions arise, resprouting is the main post‐fire regeneration strategy in fire‐prone environments, such as the Cerrado open savannas (Hoffmann, 1998; Pausas et al, 2018; Salazar & Goldstein, 2014; Zupo et al, 2020).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…It is necessary to investigate whether the subterranean structures of C. parviflora allow, in addition to resprouting, some type of vegetative propagation. Although heat tolerance is an important trait that enables germination when favorable conditions arise, resprouting is the main post‐fire regeneration strategy in fire‐prone environments, such as the Cerrado open savannas (Hoffmann, 1998; Pausas et al, 2018; Salazar & Goldstein, 2014; Zupo et al, 2020).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Fire-adapted plant populations persist due to individuals' resprout capacity (sprouting species), abundant seed production, and soil seed bank formation, and their germination can increase when post-fire-mediated dormant seeds break (Daibes et al, 2019;Keeley & Zedler, 1978;Ooi, Denham, Santana, & Auld, 2014;Pausas & Keeley, 2014). Sprouting and non-sprouting Fabaceae species show different post-fire regeneration strategies, but in the Cerrado open savannas resprouting is the most common strategy (Daibes et al, 2019;Santana et al, 2010;Schutte, Vlok, & Van Wyk, 1995;Venier, Cabido, & Funes, 2017;Zupo, Daibes, Pausas, & Fidelis, 2021). In spite of this, fire effects on seed germination in Fabaceae are not related to the regeneration form of the species (Herranz, Ferrandis, & Martínez-S anchez, 1998).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These fires maintain vegetation in an open state (Bond et al., 2004; Pausas & Bond, 2020), dominated by grasses and scattered shrubs and having few trees (Lehmann et al., 2014; Staver et al., 2011, 2017). Resprouting ability is a key functional trait in savannas to persist in such fire‐prone environments (Clarke et al., 2013; Pausas & Keeley, 2014; Pilon, Cava, et al., 2021; Simpson et al., 2021; Zupo et al., 2021). Consequently, to cope with recurrent fires in savannas, the biomass is preferentially allocated below‐ground (e.g.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…After a fire, savanna vegetation typically recovers rapidly (Pilon, Cava, et al., 2021; Zupo et al., 2021), taking an average of 2.5 years to fully recover the fuel load (Oliveira et al., 2021). Rapid regeneration is primarily determined by the ability of vegetation to resprout from fire‐protected below‐ground buds (Clarke et al., 2013; Ott et al., 2019; Pausas et al., 2018; Pilon, Cava, et al., 2021; Zupo et al., 2021).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, we can expect a high rate of survival and regrowth of individuals affected by frost in savanna areas, since many savanna species have functional adaptations to such a topkill type of disturbance (Brando & Durigan, 2004; O’Keefe et al, 2016), which is not expected for tropical forest species. Thus, the capacity of regrowth after topkill damage is of utmost importance for the maintenance of species in environments with frequent disturbance (Zupo et al, 2020) and the overall resilience of these open ecosystems (Buisson et al, 2018).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%