2011
DOI: 10.1590/s0102-30982011000200002
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Abstract: This paper covers a wide scope, focusing on some trends in East and Southeast Asia that may be of interest to Latin America. The first demographic transition has essentially been completed in both regions. The issue is what should now be the focus of our consideration of population and development? East Asian countries are now stressing issues of ultra-low fertility, and policies to raise fertility. They are not comfortable with the prospect of making up future deficits through international migration. The pap… Show more

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Cited by 3 publications
(19 citation statements)
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References 33 publications
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“…Even though the area and population size differ between Thailand and Brazil, both countries have tropical climates. In addition to international migration, creating a hybrid population through inter-marriage may be associated with genetic diversity [ 31 ]. Although Thailand and the Philippines are part of Southeast Asia geographically, the DI*A and DI*B allele frequencies are significantly different and geometric genetic distance showed that Filipino was moderately related to Central Thais.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Similarly, American Natives and Africans were in an area to the far west, resulting in significantly differing JK*A and JK*B frequencies from those of southern Thai-Muslims. In addition to geographic region, other factors come into play (e.g., homogeneous populations may be involved in the differing of allele frequencies between Thai-Muslims and eastern Asians, including Japanese, Korean and Chinese) ( 27 ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Si bien la transición demográfica se considera un proceso universal, no se desarrolla de forma homogénea en todas las regiones. Cada lugar tiene características propias que confieren ritmos y características distintas al fenómeno, especialmente debido a su contexto histórico y, por lo tanto, a sus aspectos socioeconómicos, culturales y educativos únicos (Coale, 1986;Wong, Carvalho y Aguirre, 2000;Palloni, Pinto-Aguirre y Pelaez, 2002;Brito, 2007;Jones, 2011).…”
Section: Introductionunclassified