2007
DOI: 10.14356/kona.2007007
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Abstract: This paper gives a review on the plasma synthesis of nanoparticulate powders.

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Cited by 39 publications
(16 citation statements)
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References 23 publications
(40 reference statements)
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“…flame synthesis (Wegner and Pratsinis, 2000), thermal evaporation (Granqvist and Buhrman, 1976), and plasma synthesis (Vollath, 2007;Binns, 2001). The technique presented in this article is a plasma-based technique based on high-power pulses similar to what is used in the HiPIMS discharge.…”
Section: Nanoparticle Synthesismentioning
confidence: 99%
“…flame synthesis (Wegner and Pratsinis, 2000), thermal evaporation (Granqvist and Buhrman, 1976), and plasma synthesis (Vollath, 2007;Binns, 2001). The technique presented in this article is a plasma-based technique based on high-power pulses similar to what is used in the HiPIMS discharge.…”
Section: Nanoparticle Synthesismentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The aim of the present work is to explore the impurity chemistry and surface passivation of the Cu nanopowders as a function of the operating conditions in a DC thermal plasma synthesis. Among other gas-phase processes for the fabrication of nanopowders, the thermal plasma synthesis [15,16] delivers greater flexibility in creating chemically diverse working environments by appropriate choice of the plasma-forming gas and the feedstock. However, these processing capabilities remain largely untapped as an effective means of taking control over the product purity and passivation.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In this manner, one can obtain high purity metallic particles from inexpensive and easily available bulk materials. High‐temperature plasma processes driven by high power torches at atmospheric pressure are the most common, however, the agglomeration of particles appears as a main disadvantage . Low temperature plasma processes, where charging of particles prevents agglomeration, are also of interest but normally they proceed at reduced pressure, thus, the requirement of expensive vacuum systems impeded on their usage on large scale.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%