2009
DOI: 10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2009.03.006 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Physical attractiveness has been associated with mating behavior, but its role in reproductive success of contemporary humans has received surprisingly little attention. In the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (1244 women, 997 men born between 1937 and 1940) we examined whether attractiveness assessed from photographs taken at age ~18 predicted the number of biological children at age 53-56. In women, attractiveness predicted higher reproductive success in a nonlinear fashion, so that attractive (second highest qu… Show more

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“…Based on this, it has been asserted that for a man, having an attractive face carries information about his being particularly strong and healthy, in addition to giving information about his testosterone level. Also, the finding that individuals who have an attractive face live longer and have more children supports the positive corrrelation between facial attractiveness, health, and reproductivity (44,45). Furthermore, the findings that people with attractive faces were found to have lower levels of cortisol under stressful circumstances, while women with beautiful faces were found to have higher estrogen levels (therefore have a higher potential of becoming pregnant), support this belief (46,47).…”
Section: Facial Beautysupporting
“…For all emotion conditions males worked to reduce viewing times below the default level indicating that these stimuli did not provide any reward to the participants but were in fact provoking an aversive reaction. Since Darwin, facial attractiveness has been considered important for mate selection as it provides a key indicator of reproductive fitness and genetic superiority (Jokela, 2009;Perrett 2012;Pflüger, Oberzaucher, Katina, Holzleitner, & Grammer, 2012.). The absence of such beauty in these faces may indicate poor reproductive potential rendering them less rewarding and less worthy of work.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…Similarly, attractive individuals benefit from an often unconscious positive bias (Dion, Berscheid, & Walster, 1972;Jokela, 2009;Langlois et al, 2000;Mobius & Rosenblat, 2006;Rhodes, 2006;Olson & Marshuetz, 2005), and enhanced levels of social interaction (Mulford, Orbell, Shatto, & Stockard, 1998;Prestia, Silverston, Wood, & Zigarmi, 2002).…”
mentioning
“…The finding that men generally prefer feminine faces (e.g., Jones et al, 2007;Komori et al, 2009;O'Connor et al, 2013) and that facial femininity is correlated with judgments of attractiveness and health by opposite sex individuals (Law Smith et al, 2006;Röder et al, 2013) as well as certain health indices and/or estrogen levels (Gray & Boothroyd, 2012;Jones et al, 2015;Thornhill & Gangestad, 2006;van Anders, 2010), longevity (Henderson & Anglin, 2003), and fertility (e.g., Jokela, 2009;Roberts et al, 2003) suggests that facial femininity may represent one such cue.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…Buss, 1989;Kenrick & Keefe, 1992) that younger women have a higher mate value than older women, due to their greater reproductive capacity. Indeed, recent research (Jokela, 2009) showed that attractive women, that is, women with a high mate value, were more likely to marry, and had more children than their unattractive counterparts. Therefore, we hypothesize that the expected age differences in gossip tendency will disappear when controlling for our participants' self-reported mate value.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning