2019
DOI: 10.1590/2175-7860201970001
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Phenological study of populations of Cnidoscolus quercifolius in the Western Seridó, Paraiba state, Brazil

Abstract: The phenological patterns of two populations of Cnidoscolus quercifolius were evaluated in the western Seridó region of Paraiba state, Brazil, from March 2009 to February 2011, with data collected monthly. The evaluations have addressed the quantitative method of analysis that represents the activity indices for both populations growing seasons (fall and sprout) and reproductive (flowering and fruiting), and also studied the intensity index Borchert, who evaluated the flow leaves. The stages were evaluated wit… Show more

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“…Recent studies have revealed marked abiotic differences between forest edges and interiors (Riutta et al 2014;Wicklein et al 2012) that can affect the reproductive patterns of plant communities and their associated species (Athayde & Morellato 2014). Phenological studies in anthropogenic landscapes, however, have largely been limited to population studies (e.g., Vogado et al 2016;Matias-Palafox et al 2017;Oliveira et al 2019), whereas the few studies with a community approach have showed increased phenological intensities of trees at forest edges (Fortunato & Quirino 2016), with synchronize different from those in the forest interior (Cunningham 2000;Reznik et al 2012). Phenological changes at the species level in response to habitat modifications can vary among functional groups and successional stages (Xiao et al 2016).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Recent studies have revealed marked abiotic differences between forest edges and interiors (Riutta et al 2014;Wicklein et al 2012) that can affect the reproductive patterns of plant communities and their associated species (Athayde & Morellato 2014). Phenological studies in anthropogenic landscapes, however, have largely been limited to population studies (e.g., Vogado et al 2016;Matias-Palafox et al 2017;Oliveira et al 2019), whereas the few studies with a community approach have showed increased phenological intensities of trees at forest edges (Fortunato & Quirino 2016), with synchronize different from those in the forest interior (Cunningham 2000;Reznik et al 2012). Phenological changes at the species level in response to habitat modifications can vary among functional groups and successional stages (Xiao et al 2016).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%