1980
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.116.7.791
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Perineural invasion by keratoacanthoma

Abstract: In 18 examples of keratoacanthoma, the proliferating squamous epithelium histologically invaded the perineural space. The invasion did not adversely affect the biologic behavior and the prognosis.

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Cited by 21 publications
(16 citation statements)
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“…In KA, especially of the head and neck, neurotropic invasion is often observed in dermatohistopathology, but only rarely reported in the literature [3][4][5]. With the spontaneous regression of KA, the involution of the neurotropic component is assumed.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…In KA, especially of the head and neck, neurotropic invasion is often observed in dermatohistopathology, but only rarely reported in the literature [3][4][5]. With the spontaneous regression of KA, the involution of the neurotropic component is assumed.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Complications of identified neurotropic KAs Janecka, 1977 [9] Perineural spread up to 2 cm away from the KA Lapins, 1980 [5] Perineural spread into the mimic muscles Cooper, 1988 [3] Recurrence, perineural spread into mimic muscles Wagner, 1987 [10] Recurrence, growth into cranial nerve (n. supratrochlearis) Hodak, 1993 [2] Metastases into parotis gland, axillary and regional lymph nodes Grossniklaus, 1996 [11] Growth into cranial nerve, invasion into sinus cavernosus, irradiation necessary…”
Section: Author Yearmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…1 This characteristic benign behavior reportedly holds true in cases of KA of the head and neck even when they exhibit perineural invasion (PNI) on histologic examination. [2][3][4] There is a paucity of data regarding KA with PNI, but the evidence that exists suggests that PNI is an incidental finding that does not affect patient outcome. For this reason, many dermatologic surgeons do not alter their treatment plan when PNI is encountered in the treatment of KA of the head and neck, whereas they would probably recommend radiation therapy or more aggressive surgery for SCCs that exhibit similar histologic findings.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%