2017
DOI: 10.1007/s00442-017-3961-x View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Some plant species use different strategies to acquire phosphorus (P) dependent on environmental conditions, but studies investigating the relative significance of P-acquisition strategies with changing P availability are rare. We combined a natural P availability gradient and a glasshouse study with 10 levels of P supplies to investigate the roles of rhizosphere carboxylates and transpiration-driven mass flow in P acquisition by Agonis flexuosa. Leaf P concentrations of A. flexuosa decreased and leaf manganes… Show more

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“…C). A similar result was observed by D'Angioli et al () for Zea mays and by Huang et al () for Agonis flexuosa (Myrtaceae), which also grows along the entire Warren chronosequence. When grown in a glasshouse, the amount of rhizosphere carboxylates of A. flexuosa increased twofold between 0 and 30 mg P kg −1 soil treatments.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
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“…C). A similar result was observed by D'Angioli et al () for Zea mays and by Huang et al () for Agonis flexuosa (Myrtaceae), which also grows along the entire Warren chronosequence. When grown in a glasshouse, the amount of rhizosphere carboxylates of A. flexuosa increased twofold between 0 and 30 mg P kg −1 soil treatments.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
“…If Bossiaea released more carboxylates than co‐occurring species at each stage, we would expect them to have greater leaf [Mn] (Lambers et al ); thus, we only partly accepted our hypothesis based on field data. Co‐occurring carboxylate‐releasing species, including Proteaceae, along the Warren chronosequence (Huang et al ) and along the Jurien Bay chronosequence (Hayes et al ) present similar leaf [Mn] to those of Bossiaea ; this may indicate facilitation by neighbouring plants, as demonstrated in glasshouse experiments (Muler et al ). The similarity between leaf [Mn] of these species may be due to the root intermingling observed in the field, where we rarely found Bossiaea roots separated from cluster roots of other species.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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“…Phosphorus in the soil solution is transported to the root surface mainly by diffusion, but mass flow driven by plant transpiration can modulate nutrient acquisition by delivering nutrients to root surfaces in sandy soils with a very low buffering capacity (Barber, 1995;Cernusak, Winter, & Turner, 2011;Huang, Hayes, Ryan, Pang, & Lambers, 2017). Previous studies showed that transpiration rate is much faster under low P supply compared with that under higher P supply, for example, in white clover (Trifolium repens; Singh, Peter, Pallaghy, & McKenzie, 2000), Ficus insipida (Cernusak, Winter, Aranda, Turner, & Marshall, 2007), Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis; Bradbury & Malcolm, 1977), and Agonis flexuosa (Huang et al, 2017). Huang et al (2017) suggested that transpiration-induced mass flow possibly plays a role in P acquisition at low P availability in A. flexuosa.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…The behaviour of stomatal pores is assumed to optimize carbon gain (growth), depending on environmental conditions including access to water and the risks that arise from drought, but our understanding of these relationships remains a "work in progress" (Klein 2014;Martin-StPaul et al 2017;Matthews et al 2017;Meinzer et al 2017). Furthermore, trees capture nutrients by drawing in soil water, thus increased transpiration rates can be a response to low nutrient environments (Matimati et al 2013;Huang et al 2017).…”
Section: Vapourmentioning