2014
DOI: 10.1590/0074-0276140257
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Abstract: Clinical and laboratory risk factors for death from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) are relatively known, but quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) might assess the role of parasite load in determining clinical outcome. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors, including parasite load in peripheral blood, for VL poor outcome among children. This prospective cohort study evaluated children aged ≤ 12 years old with VL diagnosis at three times: pre-treatment (T0), during treatment (T1) and… Show more

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Cited by 12 publications
(16 citation statements)
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References 28 publications
(16 reference statements)
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“…This can be easily explained by the pathophysiology of the two diseases, as both HIV and VL lead to a compromised immune status in the patient and poor treatment outcomes [5,16,21]. …”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Leishmania burdens in treated VL patients generally decline during treatment (reviewed by Kip et al, 2014; see also Pourabbas et al, 2013;Mourão et al, 2014;Mary et al, 2004Mary et al, , 2006Aoun et al, 2009;Sudarshan et al, 2011). However inadequate drugs, doses and durations may result in parasite persistence (e.g.…”
Section: Parasite Loads In Response To Treatmentmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Pourabbas et al (2013); Mourão et al (2014)), and even in KA patients considered clinically cured without recorded relapse, residual parasites may persist e.g. in 11/21 Iranian patients treated with antimony (Glucantime) Pourabbas et al, 2013; 2/6 patients treated with SAG (Verma et al, 2010), and 4/48 Brazil children under various treatment regimes (Mourão et al, 2014).…”
Section: Parasite Loads In Response To Treatmentmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…By studying the factors associated with the parasite burden, critical clues regarding the manner in which infection by Leishmania could be controlled may be obtained (as a product of both parasite and host factors). Thus, the parasite burden could eventually serve as an alert regarding progression from infection to disease and could be used at the community level [14][15][16][17]. The parasite burden may also be used during follow-up of immunosuppressed patients as a marker of treatment success [13,[18][19][20][21][22].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This is because the disease is more prevalent in Kola to Weina Dega agro-ecological zones of Ethiopia, areas where major agricultural projects exist. 12 Predictors of mortality among VL patients include presence of drug toxicity, 13 malnutrition, 3,14,15 VL-HIV co-infection, 5,8,[15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22] thrombocytopenia, 5,10,[16][17][18][19]23 leukopenia, 5,[16][17][18][19]24 jaundice, 5,[16][17][18][19]24 relapsing course of the disease, 10,20,23 high parasite load, [25][26][27] renal failure (creatinine >1.5 mg/dl), 18,24 diarrhea, 9,10,23 nasal bleeding, 5,9,[16]…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%