1983
DOI: 10.1055/s-2007-1021962
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Abstract: Center o f Phvsio logy and Path op hy sio lo gy . D epa rt ment of E x pe rim ent al Cardiology. Universi ty o f G6ttingen , FAG Summ ary Considerable elevations 01 left ventri cular diastolic pr essure in relat io n 10 cardi ac vol ume are o ften observed in c linical sit uat io ns such as angina pect o ris, acute myocardial tnt arction and to w o utput synd rom e aft er cardicpulmcnerv bypass.80th a calci um-related increase in rest ing t ension and myo· cardial contracture have been held responsible fo r th… Show more

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Cited by 9 publications
(1 citation statement)
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“…In the present study, our finding that the lack of inotropic effect of Epi remains even after normothermia is reestablished weakens the thought that this is exclusively due to reduced adrenoreceptor affinity at low temperatures. From in vitro studies, the hypothesis of hypothermia-induced calcium overload has been favored when explaining posthypothermic myocardial dysfunction (5,15,21,29). In a recent study (37) using the present model, we were able to demonstrate that the increase of myocardial tissue calcium content was significantly dependent on the duration of hypothermic exposure.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 47%
“…In the present study, our finding that the lack of inotropic effect of Epi remains even after normothermia is reestablished weakens the thought that this is exclusively due to reduced adrenoreceptor affinity at low temperatures. From in vitro studies, the hypothesis of hypothermia-induced calcium overload has been favored when explaining posthypothermic myocardial dysfunction (5,15,21,29). In a recent study (37) using the present model, we were able to demonstrate that the increase of myocardial tissue calcium content was significantly dependent on the duration of hypothermic exposure.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 47%
“…Based on the results from these studies, cellular calcium overload, disturbed calcium homeostasis, changes in myocardial myofilament responsiveness to intracellular calcium as well as impaired high-energy phosphate homeostasis could all be proposed as important factors leading to the changes observed in the hypothermic heart and contributing to failure of functional recovery during rewarming [15-18]. …”
Section: Accidental Hypothermiamentioning
confidence: 99%