2017
DOI: 10.1093/bja/aex202
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Abstract: Cancer survivorship represents a growing clinical challenge for pain clinicians. The population of cancer survivors is rapidly expanding and many of these patients experience pain as a sequelae of their disease and its treatment. The features, pathophysiology and natural history of some painful conditions observed in cancer survivors, such as direct tumour effects, cancer induced bone pain (CIBP) or chronic post-surgical pain have received extensive exposure elsewhere in the literature. In this narrative revie… Show more

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Cited by 46 publications
(31 citation statements)
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References 171 publications
(150 reference statements)
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“…As survival time has increased with two-, three-, and four-drug combination regimens, the number of cancer survivors presenting with chronic pain has increased as well. The concept of being a "cancer survivor" is relatively new, without a consensus on its definition, but it is usually related to a patient who lives with and beyond cancer [96].…”
Section: Pain In Cancer Survivorsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Our cohort of older BMT survivors had a 2.5‐fold higher risk of reporting chronic/severe pain in comparison with a sibling cohort. Current efforts are underway to increase the understanding of the underlying etiology of chronic/severe pain in cancer survivors, such as neuropathies (chemotherapy‐induced, postoperative pain syndrome), rheumatologic pain (arthralgias), skeletal pain (osteonecrosis secondary to chronic steroid use), gastrointestinal pain (gastritis), and genitourinary pain (cystitis) . Specifically in BMT patients, pain persisting after BMT has been shown to be attributable to cGVHD, chemotherapy‐induced peripheral neuropathies, chronic steroid–induced osteopenia, and opportunistic infections (eg, herpes zoster) .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Broadly speaking, these syndromes can be due to chemotherapy and hormonal therapies (such as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, bone complications, and joint and muscle pain), radiation therapy (such as pain related to fistulous tracks, radiation-associated cystitis and enteritis, and radiationassociated brachial plexopathy), graft-versus-host disease, and surgical procedures (such as lymphedema, phantom pain syndromes, post-thoracotomy pain, and nerve pain,). 11,16,17 The management of these cancer pain syndromes can be complicated, particularly as patients live further into survivorship. When moderate or severe cancer pain complicates active disease-directed treatments, the use of opioid analgesics and nonopioid co-analgesic medications is accepted as a crucial component of cancer care, particularly since pain is often conceptualized as secondary to the cancer itself and/or treatment toxicities.…”
Section: Common Pain Syndromes In Cancer Survivorshipmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In cancer, NP may be the result of surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, and through other treatments or specific disease mechanisms. 1 Pain with neuropathic features is more prevalent than generally realized, with population-based studies finding that 7-10% of adults are affected. 12 NP is more distressing than nociceptive pain, with a greater impact on life and health, 13 and the impact is more dependent on its severity than its underlying cause.…”
Section: Neuropathic Painmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Brown and Farquhar-Smith list the possible causes: pain from the tumour (including neuropathies associated with haematological malignancy); bone pain; post-surgical pain; neuropathy induced by chemotherapy, biological agents, monoclonal antibodies or aromatase inhibitors; and radiation-induced pain. 1 They describe the latest knowledge of the biological mechanisms of each of these, such as the host of cytokines and growth factors released by the tumour and stromal cells that lead to neuronal sensitization, and encourage us by indicating how this knowledge is leading to new potential treatments. Emphasising that a 'one size fits all' approach to treating pain in cancer survivors is unhelpful, they summarise the treatments available and the evidence for their effectiveness.…”
Section: Box 1 Examples Of Neupsig Outputsmentioning
confidence: 99%