2014
DOI: 10.1590/s0004-28032014000300002
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Abstract: Context Bariatric surgery has become the most effective method for producing weight loss in obese patients. The evaluation of improvement of comorbidities and changes in the quality of life are important outcome factors; however, it is necessary to investigate whether they persist over the long term. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 143 obese patients from our institution from February 2007 to February 2008. These patients were divided into five independent groups, one being a control group, … Show more

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Cited by 37 publications
(36 citation statements)
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References 19 publications
(36 reference statements)
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“…Obesity may contribute to the occurrence of various health conditions such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, and certain cancer forms (Marsicano, Sales‐Peres, Ceneviva, & de Sales‐Peres, ; Vairavamurthy, Cheskin, Kraitchman, Arepally, & Weiss, ; Vinciguerra et al, ) and associates with oral health problems such as dental caries, periodontitis, and hyposalivation (Marsicano, Sales‐Peres, Ceneviva, & de Sales‐Peres, ). Bariatric surgery is considered to be one of the most effective and a safe method to achieve weight loss in adults and may improve systemic conditions (Barbosa et al, ; Costa, Yamaguchi, Santo, Riccioppo, & Pinto‐Junior, ). However, bariatric surgery may also have negative impact on oral health conditions because of an increase in periodontal disease, caries, and dental wear (de Moura‐Grec et al, ; Heling et al, ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Obesity may contribute to the occurrence of various health conditions such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, and certain cancer forms (Marsicano, Sales‐Peres, Ceneviva, & de Sales‐Peres, ; Vairavamurthy, Cheskin, Kraitchman, Arepally, & Weiss, ; Vinciguerra et al, ) and associates with oral health problems such as dental caries, periodontitis, and hyposalivation (Marsicano, Sales‐Peres, Ceneviva, & de Sales‐Peres, ). Bariatric surgery is considered to be one of the most effective and a safe method to achieve weight loss in adults and may improve systemic conditions (Barbosa et al, ; Costa, Yamaguchi, Santo, Riccioppo, & Pinto‐Junior, ). However, bariatric surgery may also have negative impact on oral health conditions because of an increase in periodontal disease, caries, and dental wear (de Moura‐Grec et al, ; Heling et al, ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although bariatric surgery procedures effectively treat morbid obesity and reduce rates of long-term obesity-related complications [1, 2], weight regain might occur in up to 20% of all patients. Among a multitude of possible factors associated with weight regain, gastric outlet dilation occurs when its diameter exceeds 14–20 mm, ultimately leading patients back to obesity [3].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, adverse effects of some and the transient weight losses associated with others[27] mean that the pharmacological management of obesity remains suboptimal. The only proven treatment to achieve and maintain weight loss in obesity is bariatric surgery[28-30]. However, surgical and anaesthetic risks associated with overweight and obese status sees these invasive procedures reserved to those patients classed morbidly obese (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m 2 ) or as a last resort in those failing more conservative management[20,31,32].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%