2012
DOI: 10.1590/s0085-56262012000400013
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Orchid bee baits attracting bees of the genus Megalopta (Hymenoptera, Halictidae) in Bauru region, São Paulo, Brazil: abundance, seasonality, and the importance of odors for dim-light bees

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Cited by 17 publications
(8 citation statements)
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References 27 publications
(15 reference statements)
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“…X. tranquebarica can discriminate color landmarks during nocturnal homing (Somanathan et al, 2008b) and they visit flowers with varied display attributes (color, size, and shape) in our site and in Thailand (Burgett et al, 2005), which suggests involvement of varied sensory cues during foraging. Two recent studies have demonstrated that nocturnal halictid bee species belonging to the genus Megalopta are attracted to odor baits (Carvalho et al, 2012;Knoll and Santos, 2012). Furthermore, the lower flower constancy in this species, at least with respect to pollen collection, merits further investigation into how nocturnal bees detect and memorize features of flowers and their spatial locations.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 94%
“…X. tranquebarica can discriminate color landmarks during nocturnal homing (Somanathan et al, 2008b) and they visit flowers with varied display attributes (color, size, and shape) in our site and in Thailand (Burgett et al, 2005), which suggests involvement of varied sensory cues during foraging. Two recent studies have demonstrated that nocturnal halictid bee species belonging to the genus Megalopta are attracted to odor baits (Carvalho et al, 2012;Knoll and Santos, 2012). Furthermore, the lower flower constancy in this species, at least with respect to pollen collection, merits further investigation into how nocturnal bees detect and memorize features of flowers and their spatial locations.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 94%
“…They confirm earlier studies performed outside a pollination context, which found that such bees respond to olfactory cues in the absence of visual ones (Carvalho et al . ; Knoll & Santos ). Olfactory cues are likely also involved in attraction of diurnal bees.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…Recently, Carvalho et al . () and Knoll & Santos () attracted nocturnal bees ( Megalopta spp.) to euglossine scent traps, suggesting that these bees use olfactory cues to find flowers.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Odor baits were left to attract bees from 7 am to 11 am in all sites at the same time. This method is specific for Euglossini, but is also used for nocturnal bees (e.g., genus Megalopta ), 40,41 which possibly could enhance our species surveying. (ii) Pan traps : Like the odor baits, three disposable plastic plates (yellow, white and red) containing water and three drops of detergent were placed at ground level and approximately 1 m from each other also for 4 h of exposition.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%