Proceedings of the 1999 IEEE Information Theory and Communications Workshop (Cat. No. 99EX253)
DOI: 10.1109/itcom.1999.781449
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Abstract: We introduce the concept of q-ary superimposed codes. These codes are to be used in a multi-user concept where the set of active users is small compared to the total amount of potential users. The active transmitters use signatures or" length n of q-ary symbols to be t r a n s m i t t e d over a common channel and the channel output is equal to the set of active input values. We give bounds on the cardinality of the class of signatures as a function of the length n and the number of active users. Furthermore, … Show more

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“…They have the property that all Boolean OR functions of sufficiently small collections of codewords differ from each other or are not covering each other. There exist many algebraic construction techniques for superimposed codes [3], [13], but we focus our attention on those based on Maximal Distance Separable (MDS) codes, e.g., Reed-Solomon codes [5]. This class of superimposed codes is readily applicable to noisy discrimination problems, such as those encountered in DNA microarray systems.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…They have the property that all Boolean OR functions of sufficiently small collections of codewords differ from each other or are not covering each other. There exist many algebraic construction techniques for superimposed codes [3], [13], but we focus our attention on those based on Maximal Distance Separable (MDS) codes, e.g., Reed-Solomon codes [5]. This class of superimposed codes is readily applicable to noisy discrimination problems, such as those encountered in DNA microarray systems.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%