2008
DOI: 10.1080/10916460701205195 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: This study seeks to investigate the use of a surfactant derived from coconut oil in the recovery process of organic compounds from oily effluents. To evaluate its efficiency in oil removal and its optimal concentration for each oil/water ratio, experiments were carried out using water/oil emulsions (50, 100, 200, and 400 ppm of oil) and produced water (50 ppm) in a small-scale column. According to these experiments, it was verified that there is an optimum surfactant concentration for each emulsion, and for pr… Show more

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“…3) Higher temperatures above 90 ο C would result an adverse performance scheme for IAF unit. 4) An interesting indication was that large amounts of coagulation agents that were required to improve the oil/water separation (Al-Maliky et al, 2009;Oliveira et al, 2008;Arnold and Stewart, 2008) could be overcome by the application of the above design and operational results; e.g, width/height ratios 1.75, 2:1 and/or water temperature range of 80-84 ο C. That, of course, is not a final decision as another calculation should be made to compare costs and resources relevant to the application of each scheme.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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“…3) Higher temperatures above 90 ο C would result an adverse performance scheme for IAF unit. 4) An interesting indication was that large amounts of coagulation agents that were required to improve the oil/water separation (Al-Maliky et al, 2009;Oliveira et al, 2008;Arnold and Stewart, 2008) could be overcome by the application of the above design and operational results; e.g, width/height ratios 1.75, 2:1 and/or water temperature range of 80-84 ο C. That, of course, is not a final decision as another calculation should be made to compare costs and resources relevant to the application of each scheme.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…On the other hand, the turbulent mechanism can be divided into the contribution of the motion created by the local fluid velocity (small solid particles, low levels of turbulence) and the contribution of the inertial motion over and above the local fluid velocity (large particles, high levels of turbulence). In the latter case, the two sub-mechanisms do not act simultaneously, but the one prevails over the other depending on the specific turbulent flow field characteristics (Oliveira et al, 2008). Arnold and Stewart (2008) have indicated that the operation of IAF systems increases when the water temperature increases up to 60 o C. The temperature directly affects the density, viscosity and surface tension of both oil and water and hence affects the turbulence that in turn affects the inter-particular motion.…”
Section: Flotation Mechanismsmentioning
“…The surfactant was added to PW and FPW as an aqueous solution to adjust the surfactant concentration to 2g/L, under agitation, promoting flake formation (surfactant+oil). Later, the solution was submitted to the flotation (Lima et al, 2008), generating the produced water streams SPW and SFPW.…”
Section: Pw and Fpw Treatment Using An Anionic Surfactantmentioning
“…The anionic surfactant used in the treatment of the produced waters (PW and FPW) has, as a premise, the ability to reduce the oil/water interfacial tension until the point where the liquid film around the dispersed oil droplets is broken. This breakage promotes an increase in the size of these droplets, improving the flotation separation (Lima et al, 2008). This work used the flotation method to separate the flakes from the clarified wastewater, obtaining a residual concentration of oil lower than 1.0mg/L.…”
Section: Produced Water Treatmentmentioning
“…A cooling system was used to keep the feed solution temperature at 25 °C. For characterization of the rejection performance, a synthesized oily solution of 250 ppm oil concentration was used as the oily wastewater samples because this concentration is typically or normally prepared for most oily wastewater [22][23][24][25][26]. In addition, this concentration is comparable with other oil related effluent sources (palm oil mill = 50-1000 ppm, car/motorcycle workshop = 14-420 ppm, petroleum refining = 20-4000 mg/L, metal processing and finishing = 100-20000 mg/L, cleaning bilge water from ships = 30-2000 mg/L, car washing = 50-2000 mg/L, and wood preservation = 50-1500 mg/L) [27][28][29].…”
Section: Oily Wastewater Treatment By Ultrafiltration Processmentioning