2018
DOI: 10.33338/ef.71221
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Offspring sex ratio shifts of the solitary parasitoid wasp, Trichopria drosophilae (Hymenoptera: Diapriidae), under local mate competition

Abstract: Localmate competition (LMC) models predict a female-biased offspring sex ratio when a single foundress oviposits alone in a patch and an increasing proportion of sons with increasing foundress number. We tested whether the solitary pupal parasitoid, Trichopria drosophilae (Hymenoptera: Diapriidae), adjusted offspring sex ratio with foundress number when parasitizing Drosophila melanogaster pupae. Mean number of female offspring was higher than that of males, with a male proportion of 26 ± 16% when only one fou… Show more

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Cited by 4 publications
(4 citation statements)
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References 27 publications
(43 reference statements)
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“…However, deviation in this proportion are not rare and can be attributed to ecological, physiological, and behavioral factors (Flanders 1939;Peruquetti & Lama 2003). In a study with T. drosophilae, a sex ratio close to 0.5 was verified when a higher number of foundress were competing for D. melanogaster pupae (Li et al 2018), while in our study, the proportion of females in offspring was always higher than 0.5, regardless the density. In fact, despite the variation, sex ratio of offspring produced by females in different competition environments were female-biased.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 41%
“…However, deviation in this proportion are not rare and can be attributed to ecological, physiological, and behavioral factors (Flanders 1939;Peruquetti & Lama 2003). In a study with T. drosophilae, a sex ratio close to 0.5 was verified when a higher number of foundress were competing for D. melanogaster pupae (Li et al 2018), while in our study, the proportion of females in offspring was always higher than 0.5, regardless the density. In fact, despite the variation, sex ratio of offspring produced by females in different competition environments were female-biased.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 41%
“…Diet had no direct effect on offspring sex ratio, which was in the range reported for T. drosophilae females in a situation free of local mate competition at the beginning of the oviposition period [ 28 ]. Honey- or buckwheat-fed females produced more daughters over a longer period than those on the other diets, probably because males also survived longer in these treatments.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Maternal factors also affect the offspring sex ratio, such as age (Uçkan & Gülel, 2002; Hu et al, 2012; Liu et al, 2020) or body size (Santolamazza‐Carbone et al, 2007; Herlin et al, 2019). The evolutionary model of ‘local mate competition’ predicts that females in quasi‐gregarious and gregarious species manipulate the sex ratio of the offspring according to the number of females within the patch to enhance their fitness (Hamilton, 1967; Werren, 1983; Cook et al, 1994; Li et al, 2018; Du et al, 2021).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%