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“…Patients may experience headache, fuzziness or eye redness, decreased visual acuity and photosensitivity. [6] Our case was presented with complaints of eye redness, pain and decreased vision. In some studies, diagnostic criteria for tuberculosis uveitis have been established.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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“…Patients may experience headache, fuzziness or eye redness, decreased visual acuity and photosensitivity. [6] Our case was presented with complaints of eye redness, pain and decreased vision. In some studies, diagnostic criteria for tuberculosis uveitis have been established.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…[4] TB-related ocular inflammation occurs either through direct invasion of tuberculosis bacillus or as a result of an immunogenic reaction due to extraocular infectious foci. [5,6] Although ocular TB involves any part of the eye, it can be remain unnoticed in the absence of clinically evident symptoms or findings, if there is no history of TB or other systemic signs. We report an adolescent case who was diagnosed with pulmonary and ocular TB while investigating the underlying cause of granulomatous uveitis.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“… 90 Three cats in this study showed inflammatory changes restricted to the outer coat of the eye (cornea, sclera, and conjunctiva). This could result from direct inoculation of mycobacteria or contamination of a wound following an ocular injury, 4 or it could represent a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to remote mycobacterial antigens. 4 , 68 The exact mechanism by which remote mycobacterial antigens elicit a type IV hypersensitivity response in the outer tunic of the eye is not fully understood.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…This could result from direct inoculation of mycobacteria or contamination of a wound following an ocular injury, 4 or it could represent a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to remote mycobacterial antigens. 4 , 68 The exact mechanism by which remote mycobacterial antigens elicit a type IV hypersensitivity response in the outer tunic of the eye is not fully understood. 66 The cornea, sclera, and/or conjunctiva may become sensitized to mycobacterial antigens from the environment.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…Ocular TB is less frequently observed and its diagnosis and treatment are fraught with difficulties due to a wide variety of manifestations. 4 , 5 The estimated prevalence of intraocular TB ranges from 0.317% to 0.6% among the individuals with uveitis. 6 , 7 A few studies reported that the prevalence of intraocular TB ranges from 0.3% to 28.2% in uveitis patients who were from various countries.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning