2018
DOI: 10.1590/s1984-296120180060
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Abstract: Dioctophymatosis is caused by the giant kidney worm Dioctophyme renale which occurs in dogs, cats, and wild mammals. In Brazil, the disease has been diagnosed in dogs from several states around the country. In the present study, the occurrence of D. renale larvae in snakes from southern of Brazil is reported. Three specimens of Philodryas patagoniensis (Serpentes: Dipsadidae) (common names in Brazil: “parelheira”, “papa-pinto”) roadkill in the county of Capão do Leão, State of Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazi… Show more

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Cited by 7 publications
(2 citation statements)
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References 19 publications
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“…Thus, knowing aspects of its ecology and geographical distribution becomes very important for the data production to be used as a basis for bioassessment research and for public health issues, since Lumbriculus variegatus (Müller, 1774) (Lumbriculidae, Clitellata) was identified in as the intermediate host of Dioctophyme renale (Goeze, 1782) (Nematoda, Dioctophymatidae) (Mace and Anderson, 1975). Dioctophyme renale has a worldwide distribution and can affect dogs, cats, wild mammals and even human (Mascarenhas et al, 2018) being characterized as zoonosis (Pedrassani and Nascimento, 2015). The life cycle of parasite occurs through the ingestion of eggs by Lumbriculus variegatus, which is the only intermediate host essential for the continuation of the cycle.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Thus, knowing aspects of its ecology and geographical distribution becomes very important for the data production to be used as a basis for bioassessment research and for public health issues, since Lumbriculus variegatus (Müller, 1774) (Lumbriculidae, Clitellata) was identified in as the intermediate host of Dioctophyme renale (Goeze, 1782) (Nematoda, Dioctophymatidae) (Mace and Anderson, 1975). Dioctophyme renale has a worldwide distribution and can affect dogs, cats, wild mammals and even human (Mascarenhas et al, 2018) being characterized as zoonosis (Pedrassani and Nascimento, 2015). The life cycle of parasite occurs through the ingestion of eggs by Lumbriculus variegatus, which is the only intermediate host essential for the continuation of the cycle.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…oligoqueto de agua dulce y éste puede ser ingerido por ranas, peces de agua dulce, tortugas dulceacuícolas y culebras, que sirven como hospedadores paraténicos (Mace & Anderson 1975;Measures 2001;Pedrassani et al 2009;Mascarenhas & Muller 2015;Mascarenhas et al 2018Mascarenhas et al , 2019. Los nemátodos presentan una coloración característica (rojo/púrpura oscuro) (Giorello et al 2017) y en cánidos domésticos su longitud varía, con un tamaño en hembras hasta 100 cm y en machos entre 11-30 cm (Urquhart et al 1998;Measures 2001;Taylor et al 2016).…”
unclassified