2015
DOI: 10.1590/s0004-28032015000300010
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Abstract: Malnutrition is frequently in hepatitis C virus patients. They have high prevalence of inadequate energy, protein and micronutrients intake, even in the absence of cirrhosis.

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Cited by 15 publications
(30 citation statements)
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References 17 publications
(30 reference statements)
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“…When considering the BMI as a method of assessment of nutritional status, we did not find any significant differences between the three studied groups (p=0.916), but an important observation was a higher than expected prevalence of overweight among the chronic HCV (62.5%) and the compensated liver cirrhosis groups (67.5%). This was in accordance with a Brazilian study by Gottschall et al assessing the nutritional status in non-cirrhotic chronic hepatitis C patients which also reported an increase in the prevalence of overweight among the studied population [42] and explained that this could be a consequence of unfavourable changes in the dietary patterns such as an increased consumption of processed food or a decrease in the occupational energy expenditure [43].…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 92%
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“…When considering the BMI as a method of assessment of nutritional status, we did not find any significant differences between the three studied groups (p=0.916), but an important observation was a higher than expected prevalence of overweight among the chronic HCV (62.5%) and the compensated liver cirrhosis groups (67.5%). This was in accordance with a Brazilian study by Gottschall et al assessing the nutritional status in non-cirrhotic chronic hepatitis C patients which also reported an increase in the prevalence of overweight among the studied population [42] and explained that this could be a consequence of unfavourable changes in the dietary patterns such as an increased consumption of processed food or a decrease in the occupational energy expenditure [43].…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 92%
“…They had expected, however, to find the nutritional status of patients with chronic hepatitis C to be closely matched to the healthy control subjects but this was not the case and they suggested that this was most probably a result of restricted protein and caloric intake. Similarly a study by Gottschall et al found a significant risk of malnutrition in the chronic hepatitis C group which was found to be 16% [42].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 79%
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“…Another study found APMT to be significantly associated only with disease severity (p < 0.05), but also showed a low prevalence of malnutrition, a weak association with GSA (ƙ = 0.222) and no association with the diagnosis of malnutrition and inadequate dietary intake 21 . Two studies conducted in 2015 and 2016 with non-cirrhotic hepatitis C patients and patients before and after hepatic transplantation, respectively, did not identify any individuals with malnutrition and, therefore, APMT presented poor performance 22 , 23 .…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The dynapenia, decreased muscle strength without neurological or muscular disease, have been studied beyond aging [45]. The HGS had greater capacity to detect malnutrition in people with chronic liver disease, besides the capacity to predict morbimortality [15,46,47]. Hiraoka et al have shown that an isolated HGS reduction was more prevalent than isolated skeletal muscular volume in patients with chronic liver disease.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%