2004
DOI: 10.1080/01650250344000316 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
|
Christina Saltaris,
Lisa A. Serbin,
Dale M. Stack
et al.

Abstract: The current investigation was designed to examine the provision of cognitive stimulation to preschool-aged children from high-risk families. Participants were drawn from the Concordia Longitudinal Risk Project, a prospective, longitudinal investigation of individuals recruited in 1976–77 from lower SES neighbourhoods who were rated by childhood peers on standardised scales of aggression and social withdrawal. Based on a subsample of women followed from childhood to motherhood ( N = 51), we found that childhood… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance
Select...
1
1
1
1
2
21
0
1

Year Published

2005
2005
2015
2015

Publication Types

Select...
4

Relationship

1
3

Authors

Journals

2
21
0
1
Order By: Relevance
“…Research also indicates a link between the quality of maternal assistance and children's acquisition of cognitive skills. Several studies indicate that high-quality maternal scaffolding helps the child acquire new knowledge and learn useful cognitive strategies (Hartmann, Eri, & Skinstad, 1989;Molfese, DiLalla, & Lovelace, 1996;Saltaris et al, 2004). Nevertheless, when it comes to testing the attachment-teaching hypothesis, we could find only a few studies directly investigating the idea that supportive maternal scaffolding can explain why securely attached children perform better on academic tasks.…”
Section: Mechanisms Mediating Between Parental Attachment and Academimentioning
Create an account to read the remaining citation statements from this report. You will also get access to:
  • Search over 1.2b+ citation statments to see what is being said about any topic in the research literature
  • Advanced Search to find publications that support or contrast your research
  • Citation reports and visualizations to easily see what publications are saying about each other
  • Browser extension to see Smart Citations wherever you read research
  • Dashboards to evaluate and keep track of groups of publications
  • Alerts to stay on top of citations as they happen
  • Automated reference checks to make sure you are citing reliable research in your manuscripts
  • 7 day free preview of our premium features.

Trusted by researchers and organizations around the world

Over 130,000 students researchers, and industry experts at use scite

See what students are saying

rupbmjkragerfmgwileyiopcupepmcmbcthiemesagefrontiersapsiucrarxivemeralduhksmucshluniversity-of-gavle
“…Research also indicates a link between the quality of maternal assistance and children's acquisition of cognitive skills. Several studies indicate that high-quality maternal scaffolding helps the child acquire new knowledge and learn useful cognitive strategies (Hartmann, Eri, & Skinstad, 1989;Molfese, DiLalla, & Lovelace, 1996;Saltaris et al, 2004). Nevertheless, when it comes to testing the attachment-teaching hypothesis, we could find only a few studies directly investigating the idea that supportive maternal scaffolding can explain why securely attached children perform better on academic tasks.…”
Section: Mechanisms Mediating Between Parental Attachment and Academimentioning
“…Dans d'autres études de l'échantillon Concordia, nous avons examiné d'autres compétences parentales ainsi que les variables contextuelles qui pourraient servir de vecteurs de transmission de risque. Par exemple, une étude a révélé que les antécédents d'agressivité des parents sont en corrélation inverse avec la stimulation cognitive des enfants en bas âge (Saltaris et al, 2004). Dans une étude de 51 dyades mère-enfant, le niveau de stimulation cognitive a été mesuré dans deux contextes : (1) le soutien maternel à l'apprentissage lors d'une activité d'enseignement structurée à l'aide de casse-têtes et (2) la qualité du milieu de vie à la maison, telle que mesurée à l'aide des échelles HOME (Bradley et Caldwell, 1984).…”
Section: Compétences Parentales Et Développement Des Enfantsunclassified
“…For example, children who live in an intense interaction environment both at home and in playgroup or kindergarten settings learn to listen and pronounce words correctly than those who do not. At the time of entering school, the nature of behavior developed can be positive or negative depending on the environment where the children are brought up (Olsen & Maertin, 1999;Saltaris et al, 2004;Karr-Morse & Wiley, 1997;Young, 2002).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning