2009
DOI: 10.1590/s0066-782x2009001100004
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Abstract: Voluntary running and forced running induced different levels of Hsp72 in the myocardium of female Wistar rats.

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Cited by 7 publications
(55 citation statements)
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References 40 publications
(55 reference statements)
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“…In CFA-injected rats with access to running wheels, however, we observed significantly lower corticosterone levels that were comparable to sham levels. While no studies were found assessing voluntary exercise-induced effects on plasma corticosterone in persistent pain states, forced exercise increases plasma corticosterone levels in models of traumatic brain jury [48] and brain ischemia [62], whereas voluntary exercise prevents corticosterone increases in these models as well as preventing stress-induced increases in plasma corticosterone [46] and other stress hormones [89]. As such, our results support a beneficial role for voluntary exercise-related stress and cardiac health benefits in persistent pain states.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In contrast, rodent studies employing therapeutic exercise uniformly show robust analgesic effects in a variety of persistent pain models and using a variety of exercise intensities [4; 9; 11; 1824; 34; 35; 41; 54; 63; 69; 81; 82; 93; 102; 103; 112; 132]. Importantly, none of these studies assessed stress-related outcomes such as plasma corticosterone despite employing forced running paradigms that can be highly stressful [28; 36; 48; 62; 74; 80; 88; 89; 92]. As such, while carefully conditioned forced running paradigms can activate reward centers in the rodent brain [52] and can result in beneficial physiological changes in certain contexts [51; 64; 92; 94], it is nonetheless difficult to determine if the observed analgesic effects were, at least in part, mediated by stress-induced analgesic mechanisms [15; 68].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Therefore, the opioid-dependent analgesic effects of forced exercise paradigms may be due at least in part to stress. In contrast, voluntary exercise is less stressful [30; 52; 54; 70; 81; 98; 133] and can in fact be considered rewarding [52; 112]. In healthy rodents, voluntary exercise promotes anxiolytic and anti-depressant effects [35; 53; 133], enhanced cognitive function/neuroprotection [5; 70; 71] and decreased mortality [108].…”
Section: Physical and Social Environment Affects Chronic Pain In Rmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Aerobic exercise is characterized by the use of large muscle groups in dynamic physical activities, such as running and swimming. It increases cardiac preload and is known to induce the eccentric type of cardiac hypertrophy, which manifests as increased left ventricular (LV) cavity dimensions and proportionally augmented LV wall thickness to normalize myocardial strain [ 8 , 9 , 10 , 11 ]. At the ultrastructural level, new sarcomeres added in series predominate resulting in increased cardiomyocyte length [ 12 , 13 , 14 , 15 , 16 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The LV remodeling after aerobic exercise training is well known to improve ventricular function in both healthy and disease conditions [ 8 , 10 ] which has been demonstrated both in isolated papillary muscle as well as in isolated cardiomyocytes from animal models [ 15 , 20 , 21 ]. The improvement in cell function by aerobic exercise training is accompanied by an increase in Ca 2+ uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase (SERCA2a) that actively transports Ca 2+ into the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum, regulates cytosolic Ca 2+ concentration and plays a pivotal role in myocardial contractility [ 15 , 22 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%