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“…[46] erected Normanniasaurus genceyi as a ‘basal’ titanosaur from the Albian of France. Titanosaurian affinities for Normanniasaurus have subsequently been supported through phylogenetic analyses [30,42,108], although our study is the first to incorporate it based on first-hand observations. All three of our analyses place Normanniasaurus with Gondwanan titanosaurian taxa, clustering either with: (i) Lognkosauria (EWP) (figure 5 a ), in which it is the sister taxon to this clade of Late Cretaceous Argentinean titanosaurs [5,70]; (ii) Aeolosaurini (EIW3) (figure 5 b ), in which it forms a clade with Aeolosaurus + Rapetosaurus krausei , from the latest Cretaceous of South America [10] and Madagascar [25], respectively; or (iii) as the sister taxon to most other titanosaurs (EIW9; figure 5 c ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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“…[46] erected Normanniasaurus genceyi as a ‘basal’ titanosaur from the Albian of France. Titanosaurian affinities for Normanniasaurus have subsequently been supported through phylogenetic analyses [30,42,108], although our study is the first to incorporate it based on first-hand observations. All three of our analyses place Normanniasaurus with Gondwanan titanosaurian taxa, clustering either with: (i) Lognkosauria (EWP) (figure 5 a ), in which it is the sister taxon to this clade of Late Cretaceous Argentinean titanosaurs [5,70]; (ii) Aeolosaurini (EIW3) (figure 5 b ), in which it forms a clade with Aeolosaurus + Rapetosaurus krausei , from the latest Cretaceous of South America [10] and Madagascar [25], respectively; or (iii) as the sister taxon to most other titanosaurs (EIW9; figure 5 c ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…However, there is a growing fossil record of Early–middle Cretaceous occurrences of titanosaurs from Eurasia, with a number of these specimens contemporaneous with, or even pre-dating, the oldest known Gondwanan remains [39–42]. These include: (i) Volgatitan simbirskiensis from the late Hauterivian of western Russia [43]; (ii) caudal vertebrae (NHMUK R5333) from the Barremian of the UK [40,44]; (iii) Tengrisaurus starkovi from the Barremian–Aptian of south-central Russia [45]; (iv) Normanniasaurus genceyi from the Albian of France [46]; (v) a caudal vertebra from the late Aptian–early Albian of Italy [47] and (vi) postcranial remains from the Cenomanian of Spain [42]. Although all of these specimens are fragmentary and highly incomplete, some appear to belong to relatively ‘derived’ titanosaurs; for example, Normanniasaurus might be an aeolosaurine [30].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…Although the faunal association of Algora is recognized as exclusive to this region (Torices et al, 2012;Pérez-García et al, 2016a;Mocho et al, 2019), several of the taxa identified there have not been analyzed in detail until now. This is mainly because the palaeontological activity carried out in this area was not initiated until few years ago.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…It corresponds to a caudal vertebra and the almost complete pelvic girdle of an elasmosaurid plesiosaur. The only taxa from Algora that have been analyzed in detail are that littoral turtle, this probably pelagic sauropterygian, and a lithostrotian titanosaur taxon recognized by the largest collection of this clade identified in a European Cenomanian site (Mocho et al, 2019). The Algora titanosaur was recovered as sister taxon of the Italian upper Aptian or lower Albian indeterminate form MSNM V7157, a Gondwanan origin having been considered for this lineage (Mocho et al, 2019).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
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