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Abstract: The explosive rhyolitic eruptions that defi ne the track of the Snake River PlainYellowstone volcanism have produced a large volume of tephra found in late Miocene and younger basin-fi ll sediments throughout the western United States. Here we use 40 Ar/ 39 Ar isotopic dating, paleomagnetic analysis, major-and trace-element geochemistry, and standard optical techniques to establish regional tephra correlations. We focus on tephra deposits in three Neogene basins in spatially separated areas-Grand Valley, in ea… Show more

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“…12 Comparison of eruption frequency from the Yellowstone hotspot as defined from the ignimbrite record and the ashfall record. Black squares represent ignimbrite record using averages for the periods a-f in Bonnichsen et al (2008) and taking into account the correlations made in this work significant decrease in eruptive frequency after~9 Ma (Perkins et al 1995;Perkins and Nash 2002), whereas Anders et al (2009) found eruption frequencies three times greater than did earlier workers.…”
Section: Eruption Frequencymentioning
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“…12 Comparison of eruption frequency from the Yellowstone hotspot as defined from the ignimbrite record and the ashfall record. Black squares represent ignimbrite record using averages for the periods a-f in Bonnichsen et al (2008) and taking into account the correlations made in this work significant decrease in eruptive frequency after~9 Ma (Perkins et al 1995;Perkins and Nash 2002), whereas Anders et al (2009) found eruption frequencies three times greater than did earlier workers.…”
Section: Eruption Frequencymentioning
“…Cerro Galan, Sparks et al 1985;Toba, Rose and Chesner 1987). Ashfall deposits associated with the CSRP eruptions are known to exist in intermontane basins across the northwestern USA and on the plains of Nebraska and Kansas (Perkins and Nash 2002;Rose et al 2003;Anders et al 2009). For example, one ashfall deposit located at Aldrich Station in southwestern Nevada and South Willow Canyon, central Utah, has been correlated to Cougar Point Tuff XIII, some 500 km away (Perkins et al 1998;Perkins and Nash 2002).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
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“…Geochemical analysis [26] of rhyolitic glass shards in the tuff bed ~80 cm above the wood bed (stratigraphic location of sample shown in (Figure 4), matches an unnamed peralkaline ash bed below the Blacktail Creek Tuff [27] from the Heise volcanic field of the eastern Snake River Plain. The Blacktail Creek Tuff is 6.61 ± 0.01 Ma (Ar-Ar age from welded ash of sample PTH4 [28]). Our sample of the unnamed ash 80 cm above the Bruneau Woodpile bed was chemostratigraphically correlated by B.P.…”
Section: Agementioning
“…The region contains a record of continuous bimodal volcanism extending over 17 Ma Coble and Mahood, 2012;Henry et al, 2017) to the present, and documents the migration of timetransgressive rhyolitic volcanism from the Bruneau-Jarbidge volcanic center (circa 12 Ma) to its present location beneath the Yellowstone Plateau (Pierce and Morgan, 1992;Anders et al, 2009). Interaction between the mantle hotspot and overlying continental lithosphere has resulted in large rhyolite calderaforming eruptions, followed by eruption of smaller basaltic shield volcanoes (Bonnichsen et al, 2008;Christiansen and McCurry, 2008;McCurry and Rodgers, 2009).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning