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“…The emergent ethnographic literature depicting situations in which migrants and refugees find themselves stranded en route, temporarily but indefinitely stuck someplace along the way on their migratory itineraries, and often vulnerable to arrest and detention, provides ample evidence of merely one example of this predicament (Mountz et al, 2002;Coutin, 2005;Collyer, 2007Collyer, , 2010Dowd, 2008;Bredeloup, 2012;Lecadet, 2013Lecadet, , 2017Tazzioli, 2013;Garelli & Tazzioli, 2017;Osseiran, 2017;Picozza, 2017;Stierl, 2017Stierl, , 2019. Similarly, an emergent literature exposes how rejected asylum seekers and other illegalised migrants and refugees increasingly find themselves 'legally stranded' even in their chosen countries of destination because they remain 'undeportable' (Ellermann, 2008;Paoletti, 2010;Sigona, 2012;Fischer, 2013Fischer, , 2015Le Leerkes & Broeders, 2013;Campesi, 2015;Courant & Kobelinski, 2016;Freedom of Movements Research Collective, 2018;Fabini, 2019). The legal limbo of undeportability points to a punitive regime of detention that generates what Carolina Sanchez Boe has called 'a "floating population" of foreign nationals [who] are subjected to a forced circular migration through prisons, detention centres, and public space' (2017: p. 189).…”
Section: Waiting As Disciplinary Powermentioning
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“…The emergent ethnographic literature depicting situations in which migrants and refugees find themselves stranded en route, temporarily but indefinitely stuck someplace along the way on their migratory itineraries, and often vulnerable to arrest and detention, provides ample evidence of merely one example of this predicament (Mountz et al, 2002;Coutin, 2005;Collyer, 2007Collyer, , 2010Dowd, 2008;Bredeloup, 2012;Lecadet, 2013Lecadet, , 2017Tazzioli, 2013;Garelli & Tazzioli, 2017;Osseiran, 2017;Picozza, 2017;Stierl, 2017Stierl, , 2019. Similarly, an emergent literature exposes how rejected asylum seekers and other illegalised migrants and refugees increasingly find themselves 'legally stranded' even in their chosen countries of destination because they remain 'undeportable' (Ellermann, 2008;Paoletti, 2010;Sigona, 2012;Fischer, 2013Fischer, , 2015Le Leerkes & Broeders, 2013;Campesi, 2015;Courant & Kobelinski, 2016;Freedom of Movements Research Collective, 2018;Fabini, 2019). The legal limbo of undeportability points to a punitive regime of detention that generates what Carolina Sanchez Boe has called 'a "floating population" of foreign nationals [who] are subjected to a forced circular migration through prisons, detention centres, and public space' (2017: p. 189).…”
Section: Waiting As Disciplinary Powermentioning
“…Recent legal-aid reform has limited and restricted funding in a way that has forced legal caseworkers to take on the role of judges (James and Killick 2010) or border officials (Fischer 2012) when deciding which cases to take on in the first place and which cases to pursue further, forcing them into 'a surveillance role, complementing or anticipating the judgements of the Home Office and its Border Agency' (James and Killick 2010: 13). Whether or not to take a case further is not a simple decision for representatives -appellants are not fully aware of these complexities and resent their representatives when they refuse a further appeal.…”
Section: The Aftermath Of the Hearingmentioning
“…This was counterbalanced with constant reassertions that migrants and detainees are in fact people, with their own history, regrets, hopes and ambitions. Fischer (2015) argued that it is of concern when we reach a point where it is not the political agency or identity of migrants that is being reclaimed, but rather their human essence. In fact, migrants' human essence is reclaimed not just in narratives of surveillance but also in their court narratives where emphasis was placed on being seen as a person, not just as an appellant and offender.…”
Section: The Right To Staymentioning
“…In recent years, the detention and deportation of non-citizens is increasingly being studied from different disciplines. Important studies have been conducted on the conditions in detention centers (Bosworth 2014), the role of NGO's in the process of detention and deportation (Fischer 2012;Kalir and Wissink 2016), the lives of deportable subjects before and after their expulsion (Andrijasevic et al 2010;Kalir 2010), the effect of deportability on attitudes toward state authorities (Cavanagh and Cauffman 2015), as well as the legal infrastructure that regulates detention and permits deportation (Kanstroom 2007).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning