1979
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.115.2.214
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Necrotic skin lesions associated with disseminated candidiasis

Abstract: A 69-year-old woman with Felty's syndrome developed necrotic skin lesions associated with disseminated Candida tropicalis infection. These lesions differed from the previously described erythematous macronodules of disseminated candidiasis, although histologically there was a dermal infiltrate of yeast and pseudohyphae. Clinically, they resembled ecthyma gangrenosum associated with Pseudomonas septicemia. We believe candidiasis should be included in the differential diagnosis of large necrotic skin lesions in … Show more

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Cited by 12 publications
(3 citation statements)
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“…In the etiology of EG, other types of bacteria may also be involved: Gram-positive cocci, such as Streptococcus pyogenes , [1,2] Staphylococcus aureus , [3] and Gram-negative cocci: Neisseria gonorrhoea , [4] or Gram-negative bacteria: E coli , [5] Citrobacter freundii , [2] Klebsiella pneumoniae , [6] Morganella morganii , [7] Burkholderia cepacia , Pseudomonas stutzeri , [8] Serratia marcescens , [9] Xanthomonas maltophilia , [10] Aeromonas hydrophila, [11] Chromobacterium violaceum . [12] There are also described cases of EG caused by fungi: Candida albicans , [13] Aspergillus fumigatus, Fusarium solani, [14] and Mucor pusilus . [15]…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…In the etiology of EG, other types of bacteria may also be involved: Gram-positive cocci, such as Streptococcus pyogenes , [1,2] Staphylococcus aureus , [3] and Gram-negative cocci: Neisseria gonorrhoea , [4] or Gram-negative bacteria: E coli , [5] Citrobacter freundii , [2] Klebsiella pneumoniae , [6] Morganella morganii , [7] Burkholderia cepacia , Pseudomonas stutzeri , [8] Serratia marcescens , [9] Xanthomonas maltophilia , [10] Aeromonas hydrophila, [11] Chromobacterium violaceum . [12] There are also described cases of EG caused by fungi: Candida albicans , [13] Aspergillus fumigatus, Fusarium solani, [14] and Mucor pusilus . [15]…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In the etiology of EG, other types of bacteria may also be involved: Gram-positive and Gram-negativ cocci, [14] Gram-negative bacteria, [2,5–12] and 3 were also described cases of EG caused by fungi. [1315] The lesions of EG are caused by necrotizing vasculitis produced by the perivascular bacterial invasion in the dermis and subcutaneous tissues.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…(3–6) In addition, fungal pathogens have been described in EG, including Aspergillus fumigatus Mucor species, Candida albicans Fusarium solani and Scytalidium dimidiatum . (4, 7) EG can manifest as either solitary or multiple lesions; presentation with a solitary lesion generally results in better prognoses. (6) EG was initially hypothesized to occur via hematogenous spread and vascular seeding of the skin, but more recent studies demonstrate that EG can occur through direct inoculation of the skin without concomitant bacteremia.…”
Section: Commentmentioning
confidence: 99%