2019
DOI: 10.1080/26410397.2019.1610275 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
Has correction 2019-7-2Has erratum 2019-5-31
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Abstract: Fifty-two maternal deaths occurred between September 2017 and August 2018 in the Rohingya refugee camps in Ukhia and Teknaf Upazilas, Cox's Bazar District, Bangladesh. Behind every one of these lives lost is a complex narrative of historical, social, and political forces, which provide an important context for reproductive health programming in Rohingya camps. Rohingya women and girls have experienced human rights violations in Myanmar for decades, including government-sponsored sexual violence and population … Show more

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“…The majority of FDMN women give birth at home: recent analyses suggest that only one out of five pregnant mothers sought delivery care from the health facilities inside the camps for varying reasons, including the prohibition from the family and distrust about the facilitybased services [16,17]. Further, between September 2017 and August 2018, 52 maternal deaths out of 82 pregnancy-related death occurred within these camps [18].…”
Section: Plos Onementioning
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“…The majority of FDMN women give birth at home: recent analyses suggest that only one out of five pregnant mothers sought delivery care from the health facilities inside the camps for varying reasons, including the prohibition from the family and distrust about the facilitybased services [16,17]. Further, between September 2017 and August 2018, 52 maternal deaths out of 82 pregnancy-related death occurred within these camps [18].…”
Section: Plos Onementioning
“…As in other major epidemics where healthcare capacity and access to it is already limited, major outbreaks like this can easily disrupt an already precarious health system. 23 Diversion of these limited health resources from existing health services, including vaccination, obstetrical care, and emergency care, may cause an increase in mortality due to disease that could normally be treated by the health system; this occurred in the Ebola outbreak in West Africa where more people died from malaria than Ebola, and in Eastern DRC, where more people died from measles than Ebola. 24,25 Such an increase in non-COVID-19 mortality is particularly concerning with the upcoming monsoon season in Bangladesh.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…As in other major epidemics where healthcare capacity and access to it is already limited, major outbreaks like this can easily disrupt an already precarious health system [35]. Diversion of these limited health resources from existing health services, including vaccination, obstetrical care, and emergency care, may cause an increase in mortality due to disease that could normally be treated by the health system; this occurred in the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, where more people died from malaria than Ebola, and in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, where more people died from measles than Ebola [36,37].…”
Section: Plos Medicinementioning