2020
DOI: 10.1007/s10722-020-00992-7
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Morphoagronomic characterization and genetic diversity of a Brazilian okra [Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench] panel

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
3
1

Citation Types

0
6
0

Year Published

2021
2021
2024
2024

Publication Types

Select...
7

Relationship

2
5

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 8 publications
(6 citation statements)
references
References 26 publications
0
6
0
Order By: Relevance
“…However, low production limits the development of the okra industries. For a long time, few okra cultivars have been bred, which has contributed to yield stagnation [ 5 ]. Developing modern cultivars with significant heterosis based on cytoplasmic male sterility associated with various chimeric open reading frames in the plant mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is common among crops.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, low production limits the development of the okra industries. For a long time, few okra cultivars have been bred, which has contributed to yield stagnation [ 5 ]. Developing modern cultivars with significant heterosis based on cytoplasmic male sterility associated with various chimeric open reading frames in the plant mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is common among crops.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Knowledge on genetic diversity plays an important role in breeding programs to improve agronomic traits and resistance to environmental stresses (ABD EL-FATTAH; HARIDY; ABBAS, 2020). Some cultivars have been released recently, including hybrids, but one open-pollinated cultivar ('Santa Cruz 47') has been dominating the market over 45 years (SILVA et al, 2021).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Nine genotypes were separated into two groups based on genetic divergence (Silva et al 2021). The seven genotypes of the first group (CNPH-19, CNPH-24, CNPH-11, CNPH-09, CNPH-05, CNPH-02, and CNPH-35, namely genitors 1 to 7) were crossed with the two genotypes of the second group (Santa Cruz 47 and CNPH-42, namely genitor 8 and 9, respectively) and vice versa, resulting in 14 hybrids and 14 reciprocal hybrids.…”
Section: Parents and Partial Diallel Crossesmentioning
confidence: 99%