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Cited by 5 publications
(4 citation statements)
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References 21 publications
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“…Sorting through these details forms the content of finite volume methods used in computational fluid dynamics. For examples focused on oceanographic problems, see Adcroft et al (1997), Adcroft et al (2008), Ringler (2011), andAdcroft (2013). Importantly, all methods must respect the conservation Eq.…”
Section: Appendix F: Finite Volume Scalar Equationsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Sorting through these details forms the content of finite volume methods used in computational fluid dynamics. For examples focused on oceanographic problems, see Adcroft et al (1997), Adcroft et al (2008), Ringler (2011), andAdcroft (2013). Importantly, all methods must respect the conservation Eq.…”
Section: Appendix F: Finite Volume Scalar Equationsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, differential equations do not provide our desired starting point for a finite volume formulation of discrete ocean model equations. We instead formulate integral budget equations for arbitrary closed moving fluid regions of finite extent, with our presentation inspired by similar treatments given by Donea et al (2004) and Ringler (2011). The resulting finite volume budgets for scalars (e.g., seawater mass, tracer mass, and potential enthalpy) and vectors (e.g., linear momentum and vorticity) offer a weak formulation of the ocean fluid mechanical equations, whereas the corresponding partial differential equations provide a strong formulation .…”
Section: Finite Volume Equations For Moving Fluid Regionsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Research. Numerous cores have been developed within the MPAS framework, including a shallow-water model (Ringler 2011), a hydrostatic atmosphere model (Rauscher et al 2013), a non-hydrostatic atmosphere model (Skamarock et al 2012), a hydrostatic ocean model (Ringler et al 2013), and sea-ice and land-ice models (under development).…”
Section: About the Model: Mpas-oceanmentioning
confidence: 99%