2017
DOI: 10.1007/s10393-017-1271-8
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Molecular Epidemiology of Trypanosomatids and Trypanosoma cruzi in Primates from Peru

Abstract: We determined the prevalence rate and risk of infection of Trypanosoma cruzi and other trypanosomatids in Peruvian non-human primates (NHPs) in the wild (n = 126) and in different captive conditions (n = 183). Blood samples were collected on filter paper, FTA cards, or EDTA tubes and tested using a nested PCR protocol targeting the 24Sα rRNA gene. Main risk factors associated with trypanosomatid and T. cruzi infection were genus and the human–animal context (wild vs captive animals). Wild NHPs had higher preva… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1
1
1
1

Citation Types

0
17
0

Year Published

2019
2019
2024
2024

Publication Types

Select...
6
2
1

Relationship

2
7

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 20 publications
(17 citation statements)
references
References 49 publications
(61 reference statements)
0
17
0
Order By: Relevance
“…There is anecdotal evidence that the red face of the bald uakari varies with health, becoming pale in sick uakaris [33,34,70], and the structure of the uakari facial skin allows a direct external assessment of haematological status [34], suggesting that the colour of the face would be an honest indicator of health. Intriguingly, uakaris appear particularly susceptible to infection by two bloodborne parasites: they showed the highest rates of infection by the malaria parasite Plasmodium brasiliensis of any NWM [71] and had an infection rate of 100% for trypanosomatids (Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli) compared with 64% for other primates on the Yavari River in Peru [72]. Hence, the physiological effects of plasmodial and trypanosomal infections might be two aspects of male quality that are signalled by facial coloration in uakaris.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…There is anecdotal evidence that the red face of the bald uakari varies with health, becoming pale in sick uakaris [33,34,70], and the structure of the uakari facial skin allows a direct external assessment of haematological status [34], suggesting that the colour of the face would be an honest indicator of health. Intriguingly, uakaris appear particularly susceptible to infection by two bloodborne parasites: they showed the highest rates of infection by the malaria parasite Plasmodium brasiliensis of any NWM [71] and had an infection rate of 100% for trypanosomatids (Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli) compared with 64% for other primates on the Yavari River in Peru [72]. Hence, the physiological effects of plasmodial and trypanosomal infections might be two aspects of male quality that are signalled by facial coloration in uakaris.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Additional testings on the feasibility of using filter paper for the conservation and transport of samples, beforemolecular analysis purposes have been conducted (Perozo et al 2006, Aysanoa et al 2017, Vitale et al 2018, Rivero et al 2018. However FTA filter paper was used, which is more expensive and not widely used, in the opposite of Whatman 903 paper which is standardized in national public health programs for the detection of metabolic diseases (msal.gob.ar 2011)…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…74,93 Samples collected onto cards are chemically stabilized, do not require immediate refrigeration or freezing, and the cards are lightweight and easily transported. 22,75,87,101 Nucleic acids suitable for PCR testing have been recovered from wild mammals, including herpesvirus DNA from Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), 62 DNA from trypanosomes from non-human primates 2 and African zebu (Bos taurus indicus), 20 RNA from rabies virus isolates, 81 and DNA for PCR and restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)based genetic profiling of wildlife in general. 101 In addition to specific research involving sampling from wildlife, the literature includes studies demonstrating stabilization of RNA and DNA from a range of pathogens that can infect wildlife.…”
Section: Methods To Improve Sample Quality For Molecular-based Assaysmentioning
confidence: 99%